Wild Earth Travel Wild Earth Travel is more a travel organization rather than a cruise company. Wild Earth Travel is founded by expedition leaders who followed their hearts and have a worldwide network of various cruise companies. These specialists have been following their passion for more than 30 years, creating the most beautiful expeditions in the furthest corners of the world. They know from first hand and foremost what itineraries are worth to visit. Apart from interesting destinations, they know where the routes and colonies are located of many animal species. Their experience gives them a unique position within the world of small-scale cruises and especially those of expeditions. These cruises are recommended for adventure travellers who are interested in nature and related cultures. Do you like a cruise on a small ship, where you can expect a lot of personal attention? This is the right place where you can find a cruise that suits you best! With Wild Earth Travel you can visit the wild habitat with its special species, all over the world. The highly selected partners of Wild Earth Travel with their professional crew and their local expertise offer you an enormous range of choices. And all expeditions are done under the guidance of experienced guides and specialists. You can choose from small sailing boats and catamarans up to various sorts of motor yachts. They have quite a range of expedition ships and small luxury ships up to imposing icebreakers. All equipped with comfortable and often luxury accommodations, intimacy, and comfort guaranteed. With Wild Earth Travel adventure and experience seem infinite. Go for it! Through the years a huge supply of expedition and small cruise ships has been formed. The ships vary in size from 2 up to 300 passengers. No long rows for the buffets or excursions. Just have a good old-fashioned exploration of a destination with a small group of interested travellers. Most of the ships have all kinds of amenities to guarantee you a pleasant stay. Small ships, which are designed to reach special and remote places, will guarantee you an amazing experience! Wild Earth Travel provides you with a cruise or expedition not only to enjoy but also to see and experience. In addition to all the relaxation, your trip is also worth learning!

Small Ships, Big Adventures

Cruise Type
Ship
Date
Days
Destination
Information
Small Yacht Cruise
Lord of the Glens
10.05.2021
17.05.2021
7
Northern Europe, Heart Of The Highlands
Fare from € 2,150
<read more>
Travelroute
Day 1

Inverness

Arrive in Inverness, and embark Lord of the Glens. Tonight, enjoy a welcome reception and dinner on board while docked in Inverness.

Day 2

Culloden and Caledonian Canal

This morning visit Culloden, the infamous battlefield where “Bonnie” Prince Charlie’s Jacobite forces were defeated in 1746, and then see the ancient standing stones of Clava Cairns. Set sail this afternoon on the Caledonian Canal, built between 1803 and 1822 to connect Loch Ness with the Great Glen’s three other lochs. Enter Loch Ness, cruise past the romantic ruins of Urquhart Castle. Ascend an impressive flight of locks that runs through the heart of Fort Augustus. Moor this evening at Fort Augustus.

Day 3

Laggan Avenue and Glenfinnan

Sail through the tree-lined section known as Laggan Avenue and into Loch Lochy and on until we descend Neptune’s Staircase, a set of eight interconnected locks, to the village of Corpach, nestled in the shadow of Ben Nevis, Great Britain’s highest mountain. In the afternoon we take the West Highland railway line over the renowned viaduct to beautiful Glenfinnan, surrounded by mountains. Moor overnight at Corpach.

Day 4

Oban

Today we enter the ocean, passing mysterious lochs and islands till we reach Oban, the seafood capital of the Highlands. Join us for a walk up to McCaig's Tower dominating the skyline of the town with great views of the Western Isles. Overnight at Oban.

Day 5

Isle of Iona and Tobermory

This morning we sail to Craignure for the excursion to the Isle of Iona, with a pause in front of Duart Castle for photographs. Visit Iona, the last resting place of some 50 Scottish Kings and where St. Columba introduced Christianity to Britain. Later sail to Tobermory, again on the Isle of Mull. Tobermory’s most striking feature is the gaily painted houses that line the waterfront originally built by the British Fisheries Company to house its workers for £20 each. Moor Mull overnight.

Day 6

Eigg and Inverie

Sail north from Tobermory to tiny Eigg this morning, catching glimpses of the islands of the Inner Hebrides along the way. At Eigg you can get a sense of what life is like for the roughly 90 people who live on this island community. Look for marine animals and birdlife, including Atlantic seals, minke whales, dolphins, porpoises and a variety of seabirds. Then sail to the town of Inverie in Loch Nevis, where you can have a drink at the most remote pub in the British Isles.

Day 7

Kyle

Early morning sail across the Sound of Sleat to Armadale and the Isle of Skye. Visit the Clan Donald Centre. Later sail to Kyle of Lochalsh from where we visit Eilean Donan Castle and Plockton. Evening Farewell Reception and Dinner. Overnight in Kyle.

Day 8

Kyle

Disembark in Kyle of Lochalsh after breakfast and drive to Inverness.

Overview

Heart Of The Highlands

This seven night voyage on board the deluxe ‘Lord of the Glens’ encompasses the main highlights of a voyage through the very heart of the Scottish Highlands introducing the interested traveller to the intricate and endlessly fascinating inland waters of the Caledonian Canal, the glistening waters of Loch Linnhe, the Sound of Mull, the Sound of Sleat and finally to Kyle Rhea with calls at Inverness, Fort Augustus, Laggan, Corpach (Fort William), Craignure (Isle of Mull), Iona, Tobermory, Isle of Eigg, Armadale on the Isle of Skye as well as nearby Loch Nevis to remote Inverie before ‘voyage end’ at Kyle of Lochalsh.

The arrangement will appeal to those seeking great natural beauty, excellent cuisine as well as sumptuous accommodations. The tariff provides for a full Scottish breakfast, luncheon, and a splendid dinner. At most ports of call there is something to interest and fascinate the weary traveller, but alternatively you are free simply to escape, perhaps read a book, and sip a glass of wine as the glories of the landscape slip by.

Highlights

Visit Culloden, the infamous battlefield where “Bonnie” Prince Charlie’s Jacobite forces were defeated in 1746 • Cruise past the romantic ruins of Urquhart Castle • Glide along the tree-lined canal known as Laggan Avenue • Visit the Isle of Iona, the last resting place of some 50 Scottish Kings and where St. Columba introduced Christianity to Britain • Look for marine animals and birdlife, including Atlantic seals, minke whales, dolphins, porpoises and a variety of seabirds

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Ship information

Lord of the Glens

Vessel Type: Luxury Small Ship

Length: 42 meters

Passenger Capacity: 54

Crew Capacity: 18

Built: 1985 Reconstructed & Renovated since 2000

Until recently, size-limiting locks prevented travellers from seeing the Highlands from the remarkable vantage point of the inland waterway that links Scotland's most famous lochs. Now, with the style of a classic luxury yacht, the 48-guest Lord of the Glens journeys through this spectacular countryside in spectacular style.

The moment you step aboard the Lord of the Glens you are surrounded by the rich mahogany finishes of the reception area and lobby. The ship is magnificently appointed and brings to mind that one is in a stately country manor rather than a five-star ship.

Cabins: Cabins are tasteful, comfortable and spacious with wonderful outside views. Most cabins have large picture windows (four have two large portholes). Facilities include a private bathroom with shower, individually controlled air-conditioning and heating, satellite television, music system, hairdryer, telephone, safety deposit box, bathrobes and toiletries.

Public Areas: With all round teak decks, hardwood finished interiors and fine fabrics, the Lord of the Glens offers a stylish and relaxing ambience. The two lounges and two open-air viewing areas are social hubs aboard shop, and the small library and cozy bar are a refuge for the more solitary.

Meals: Served in the elegant single-seating Dining Room. Chefs create healthy, delicious cuisine served by an attentive staff.

Contact
Booking
Luxury Expedition
Caledonian Sky
10.05.2021
22.05.2021
12
Northern Europe, Atlantic Island Odyssey - 2021
Fare from € 6.950
<read more>
Travelroute
Day 1

Aberdeen, Scotland

Embark the MS Caledonian Sky this afternoon. Transfers will be provided from Aberdeen Airport and rail station at a set time

Day 2

Westray & Papa Westray, Orkney Islands

Awake off the islands to the north of the Orkney mainland. On Westray we will visit Noup Head, an RSPB reserve on the sea cliffs and Notland Castle, an incomplete fortress built in the 16th century by Gilbert Balfour, Master of the Royal Household to Mary Queen of Scots, Sheriff of Orkney. Meanwhile in the main village of Pierowall we find the Westray Heritage Centre housing Neolithic carvings. Over lunch we sail the short distance to Papa Westray, where there will be the opportunity for a number of island walks. You can also visit the 3500-year-old Knap of Howar, a Neolithic farm building that claims to be the oldest standing house in Europe and the 12th century St Boniface Kirk. In the north of the island is the North Hill Reserve, home to Arctic terns and skuas and also the extremely rare Scottish primrose. In the early evening we will meet at the Papay pub for a well-deserved pre-dinner drink.

Day 3

Fair Isle, Shetland Islands

Located midway between the Shetland and Orkney islands, the tiny population of sixty or so islanders always extend us a warm welcome at the remote island of Fair Isle. Enjoy a walk across the island, searching out the puffin slopes or meet the local community and maybe purchase some of the famous knitwear. Enjoy an afternoon at sea and sail north to Lerwick where we moor overnight.

Day 4

Lerwick

We continue our exploration of Shetland today in the capital from where we visit the remarkable archaeological site of Jarlshof. The site was uncovered by a violent storm in the winter of 1896/7, revealing an extraordinary settlement embracing at least 5000 years of human history. The site contains a remarkable sequence of stone structures – late Neolithic houses, a Bronze- Age village, an Iron-Age broch and wheelhouses, several Norse longhouses, a Medieval farmstead and the 16th century laird’s house. Return to the ship for lunch and enjoy an afternoon at leisure to explore this historic port. Perhaps wander through its narrow stone lanes or maybe visit the excellent Shetland Museum, containing artefacts from shipwrecks and the whaling era. Tonight we will be entertained by local musicians as we overnight in port.

Day 5

Fetlar & Unst

Today we explore the northern islands of Fetlar and Unst. Fetlar, inhabited for over 5000 years lays claim to being the first Norse landing site in the Shetlands. Known as the most fertile of the Shetland Islands, the wildflowers bring great colour to the landscape. Our expedition team will lead walks ashore including the Fetlar Interpretative Centre and Museum where we will learn about the wildlife and archaeological history of the island. Over lunch we sail to Unst, Britain’s most northerly inhabited island and at the Heritage Centre learn about how the islanders have lived over the centuries and the industries that have prospered. We will visit the Unst Boat Haven, dedicated to the history of the island’s distinctive wooden boats which descend from Viking craft and Saxa Vord. Admire the views over Hermaness National Nature Reserve and Muckle Flugga stacks, home to thousands of birds as well as rare Arctic-alpine plants.

Day 6

Torshavn, Faroe Islands

After a morning at sea we arrive at Torshavn, the capital of the Faroe Islands. This afternoon there will be a choice of tours including a guided tour over the hills to Kirkjubour, the island’s oldest cultural centre, where we see the ruins of the 13th century St. Magnus Cathedral and the 11th century church which is still in use. We also visit the 900- year old ‘Roykstovan’, the old bishopric, considered to be the oldest wooden house in Europe. Alternatively, join a hike to the hills surrounding the town to discover the local flora and fauna. We moor overnight allowing the opportunity for an after dinner stroll.

Day 7

Vestmanna

Spend the day in Vestmanna, our base as we discover the northwest corner of Streymoy and the nearby cliffs. This morning we will board local boats to explore the vertical cliffs that climb almost 1500 feet, sailing into grottos carved by the surf over the years and watching the thousands of sea birds including puffins, guillemots, fulmars and kittiwakes that nest here each summer. After lunch on board we will drive to the beautiful village of Saksun, an isolated settlement situated beneath steep majestic mountains and see Duvugaroar, an old farmhouse, which is now a museum and visit a traditional Faeroese wooden church in Kollafjord.

Day 8

Suduroy

Over breakfast we will arrive on Suduroy, the southernmost island of the Faroe Islands. From the port of Tvoroyri we have a choice of activities. Choose to join an island drive and travel between the villages seeing the stunning geology, fjords, tunnels and architecture of the island and end at the southernmost point and the Akraberg lighthouse. In Porkeri we will take the ridge-top road which winds up the mountainside for wonderful views towards the steep cliffs on the west coast, the Beinisvoro promontory to the north and the luscious grass slopes to the east. Alternatively, those feeling active may wish to join a hike to Hvaanhagi, a beautiful, uninhibited place north of Tvoroyri on the east coast with impressive views toward the three islands Litla Dimun, Stora Dimun and Skuvoy. Spend the afternoon at sea relaxing on board.

Day 9

St Kilda & Stac Lee.

Today we arrive at St Kilda, a remarkable uninhabited archipelago some fifty miles beyond the Outer Hebrides. Dominated by the highest cliffs and sea stacks in Britain, Hirta, St Kilda’s main island was occupied on and off for at least two thousand years, with the last 36 Gaelic speaking inhabitants evacuated at their own request in 1930. Immediately after the evacuation, the island was bought by the Marquess of Bute to protect the island’s thousands of seabirds including puffin and fulmars and in 1957 it was bequeathed to The National Trust for Scotland. St Kilda is one of only two dozen UNESCO World Heritage Sites with dual status reflecting its natural and cultural significance. The local ranger will join us on board before our expedition staff lead guided walks on the island. During the day we will also cruise past one of the largest gannetries in the world at Stac Lee. The impressive stacs rise 170 metres from the sea and are home to up to 60,000 breeding pairs of northern gannet.

Day 10

Isle of Lewis & Shiant Islands, Outer Hebrides

Arrive today on the Isle of Lewis. Our morning tour will take us across the island to the beautiful west coast and to Callanish. Described as Scotland’s Stonehenge, the Callanish Standing Stones date from around 3000 BC. There are a total of 32 stones in a circular and avenue design. The stones stand like a petrified forest on the flat top of a peninsula which reaches out into East Loch Roag. Visit the excellent visitor centre to learn more about the site and venture out amongst the stones themselves to experience their mysterious atmosphere. Continue around the west coast to the site of Dun Carloway Pictish Broch. Probably built sometime in the last century BC, it would have served as an occasionally defensible residence for an extended family complete with accommodation for animals at ground floor level. We then head north to Gearrannan Blackhouse Village, a reconstructed settlement of traditional black houses where people and animals lived in close proximity. The houses are made using dry stone masonry and have thatched roofs, distinctively weighted down with rocks. Visit the small museum, enjoy a display of a typical crofting activity such as weaving and take in the views at this dramatic site on the wild Atlantic coast. After lunch on board we sail amongst the islands before anchoring off the spectacular basalt cliffs of the Shiant Islands in the mid-afternoon. We will take to the Zodiacs for a coastal cruise as this small group of little islands located a few miles off the shores of Lewis is an excellent place to spot puffins, razorbills, guillemots, seals and hopefully white-tailed eagles.

Day 11

Loch Scavaig & Canna

This morning we will visit lovely Loch Scavaig on the island of Skye. Just beyond is the freshwater Loch Corruisk with its breathtakingly beautiful view over the Cuillins. This is great walking country and our expedition team will run a series of hikes for all interests. For those who prefer a less energetic morning our Zodiacs will explore the coast looking out for seals. Return to the ship for lunch and this afternoon we will visit the island of Canna and its adjoining neighbour, Sanday, which are bound together like some rare text that reveals over 60 million years of Hebridean geology and history. They have an amazingly rich archaeological landscape with remains dating to all periods of settled occupation in Scotland. Canna is run as a single farm and bird sanctuary by the National Trust for Scotland and enjoys the best harbour in the Small Isles, a horn-shaped haven. The fertile soil and its diversity of habitats mean that the island has an incredibly rich plant life with 248 native flowering plants recorded. We will see Canna House and wander across grassy basalt plateaus to the 600-foot cliffs on the north shore.

Day 12

Staffa, Iona & Lunga

In the early morning we anchor off Staffa, where the perpendicular rock face features an imposing series of black basalt columns, known as the Colonnade, which have been cut by the sea into cathedralesque caverns, most notably Fingal’s Cave. Weather permitting, we will use our Zodiacs to explore closer. We then plan to cruise the short distance to the Isle of Iona which has been occupied for thousands of years and has been a place of pilgrimage and Christian worship for several centuries. It was to this flat, Hebridean island that St Columba fled from Ireland in 563 and established a monastery. Here his followers were responsible for the conversion of much of pagan Scotland and Northern England. No less than 62 Scottish Kings are buried in the Abbey. Visit the Abbey or perhaps walk along the white sandy beaches or go in search of the corncrake amongst the irises. After lunch we cruise northwest to the Treshnish Isles, an archipelago of uninhabited volcanic islets. Of volcanic origin, Lunga has been described as ‘a green jewel in a peacock sea’ and is a summer nesting-place for hundreds of sea birds. Here we hope to land by Zodiac and explore on foot.

Day 13

Oban

Disembark this morning after breakfast. Transfers will be provided to Glasgow International Airport and Glasgow Central Station at a fixed time.

Overview

Atlantic Island Odyssey – 2021

This unique expedition cruise is one of our most popular and will appeal to those who prefer their islands deserted, but with abundant bird and wildlife. True, Noble Caledonia can bring you all over the world, visiting all manner of exotic and wonderful places yet it is also true that some of the finest scenery, fascinating history and most endearing people are found close to home and nowhere is this truer than the islands off Scotland’s indented coastline which form stepping stones into the Atlantic. During this unique voyage, we will journey along rugged coastlines and visit once inhabited islands venturing far north to the Orkney and Shetland Islands, Faroe Islands and the Hebrides. We will witness vibrant colours and amazingly prolific birdlife, explore deserted villages and learn of the history and ancient culture of unique island life.
With no more than 100 travelling companions and our nimble Zodiacs we will be able to land on remote beaches and cruise close to shorelines and cliffs crowded with birdlife. Enabling us to land in remote places, the Zodiacs make the otherwise inaccessible readily available. Although we will set sail with a schedule, this will not be set in stone as these are perfect waters for expedition cruising and our Captain and expedition team will keep a flexible approach allowing for the opportunity to fully experience the unexpected whether it be a sighting of dolphins, a whale or any unusual event.

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Ship information

Caledonian Sky

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition
Length: 90 meters
Passenger Capacity: 114
Crew Capacity: 70
Built: 1991 / refurbished 2018
The MS Caledonian Sky accommodates a maximum of 114 passengers in 57 spacious outside suites. Many have walk-in wardrobes and some feature tub baths. There will be seven categories of suites and sixteen suites will have private balconies. For those familiar with the MS Island Sky she will feel like a second home, although there are some differences. The dining room, lounge, Lido Deck and bar are all similar. However, the ‘Club’ on the MS Caledonian Sky has been transported to the very top deck. Here, there is a library and bar which leads out on to a lovely forward deck. The ‘Club’ has wonderful views with ceiling to floor windows.
If you like the MS Island Sky, we are sure you will also approve of her sister. And, of course it is important that we offer the very best of facilities. However, equally as important are the staff on board whether they are the vessel’s crew or our own expedition staff. Noble Caledonia’s reputation has been built on providing the very best in all areas. Their crew of 70 not only offer an excellent service they are also noted for their kindness and attention to detail. A well run ship with a warm atmosphere is what we are known for, and it is because most of our crew have been with us for many years that we are able to engender such an atmosphere.
Your Suite
On board there are 57 exceptionally spacious and well-designed suites, 23 of which have private balconies located on the Promenade or Bridge Decks. Following a comprehensive refurbishment of the suites in November 2018, the suites on each deck have their own colour theme utilising fabrics from companies such as Osbourne & Little and Zimmer & Rohde. Soft hues, blended tones and the classic contemporary fabrics enhance the traditional maritime style making the passenger accommodation an inviting and relaxing place to be. Each suite exudes great character and grandeur with wood panelling and brass features found throughout. The large suites are arranged over four decks and all have outside facing views. All suites feature a sitting area complete with coffee table, armchairs and flat screen televisions (DVD players and DVDs can be borrowed from reception for use in your suite).

Your space

The spacious and finely decorated public rooms on board the MS Caledonian Sky include a large lounge featuring comfortable seating. Daily briefings given by the onboard team and talks from Guest Speakers take place in the Main Lounge which is fitted with multiple screens. For your convenience it is also possible to follow the onboard lectures from the comfort of your suite. Also in the Lounge is a 24-hour tea and coffee station along with an elegant bar where the onboard pianist plays periodically throughout the day. In addition to the Main Lounge on the Caledonian Deck, there is the recently refurbished Lounge on the Panorama Deck which has a bar, library and further spacious seating arrangements, ideal for watching the world go by as you cruise to your next destination. The Travel Library is the perfect place to relax with a good book and is well stocked with reference books pertaining to the destinations the vessel is visiting and a collection of essential reads. A selection of games and devices to access the internet via the ship’s satellite can also be found in the library. Access to the ship’s satellite Wi-Fi via your own device is complimentary on board (signal strength varies depending on location and demand). The Dining Room which can seat all guests at one sitting is located on the Castle Deck. Outside there is a rear Lido Deck which is complete with deck tables and chairs where meals are served in warm weather under shade and often occasions such as sail away parties and barbeques are held here.
On the Panorama Deck towards the front of the vessel there is an additional Observation Deck, complete with bar and comfortable cushioned deck furniture for sun bathing, relaxing with a book or catching up with fellow travellers. On the Promenade Deck there is also a small gymnasium featuring a treadmill, bicycle and cross trainer, and a hairdressers with appointments made on request. For your wellbeing, there is a clinic with Doctor on board and a lift which serves all decks.

Your dining
With only one sitting and a maximum of just over 100 passengers, the quality of cuisine will be of a consistent superior quality. Where possible and when it meets his high standards, our accomplished chef will obtain local produce in markets or buy the catch of the day from a passing fishing boat. Such purchases enhance the well stocked larders and bring a local touch to the varied menus. In the main elegant dining room, breakfast is served buffet-style, with certain items cooked to order and lunch and dinner is à la carte. When weather permits, breakfast, a buffet-style lunch and dinner are also served on deck. To enhance your dining experience even further a selection of wines are included with lunch and dinner. Afternoon tea is served in the lounge and tea and coffee are available 24 hours. With sufficient notice, most diets can be catered for on board.

For your comfort
MS Caledonian Sky is equipped with the latest safety, navigation and communications equipment along with roll stabilizers to minimize the ship’s motion. As is the joy of small ship cruising, during your voyage, we hope to offer the opportunity to visit the Captain and Officers on the Bridge to check the vessels progress by charts and learn more about your journey (subject to weather or security conditions). There is a navigation channel on the television in your suite showing the routing of the vessel. On board you will also find a clinic and doctor and a lift that serves all decks. Smoking on board is restricted to a specific area on deck.
Gratuities
Unlike many other cruise vessels, onboard the MS Caledonian Sky you do not need to worry about tipping staff as we have included them in your holiday price. In addition we tip all their guides and drivers along the way, thereby taking away the hassle of always having to remember to have some small change with you.
Contact
Booking
Luxury Expedition
Hebridean Sky
19.05.2021
29.05.2021
10
Northern Europe, Island Life
Fare from € 5,750
<read more>
Travelroute
Day 1

Inverness, Scotland

Embark the MS Hebridean Sky this afternoon in Inverness. Transfers will be provided from Inverness Railway Station and Inverness Airport at a fixed time. Enjoy welcome drinks and dinner as we sail this evening.

Day 2

Scrabster

Alight in Scrabster, the most northerly port on the Scottish mainland. This morning we will visit the Castle and Gardens of Mey, built between 1566 and 1572 by George Sinclair, 4th Earl of Caithness. The castle was purchased by Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, in 1952, who renovated and restored it and created the beautiful gardens which we will see today. Alternatively, join a local walk to Holborn Head to enjoy views over the Atlantic coast. We will have lunch on board and an afternoon at sea relaxing and listening to introductory talks from our expedition team.

Day 3

Stornoway & Shiant Islands

Awake in Stornoway, the capital of Lewis, and join a morning tour which will take us across the island to the beautiful west coast and to Callanish. Described as Scotland’s Stonehenge, the Callanish Standing Stones date from around 3000 BC. There is a total of 32 stones in a circular and avenue design standing like a petrified forest on the flat top of a peninsula which reaches out into East Loch Roag. Visit the excellent visitor centre to learn more about the site and venture out amongst the stones themselves to experience their mysterious atmosphere. Continue around the west coast to the site of Dun Carloway Pictish Broch. Probably built sometime in the last century BC, it would have served as an occasionally defensible residence for an extended family complete with accommodation for animals at ground floor level. We then head north to Gearrannan Blackhouse Village, a reconstructed settlement of traditional black houses where people and animals lived in close proximity. The houses are made using dry stone masonry and have thatched roofs, distinctively weighted down with rocks. Visit the small museum, enjoy a display of a typical crofting activity such as weaving and take in the views at this dramatic site on the wild Atlantic coast. After lunch on board we sail amongst the islands before anchoring off the spectacular basalt cliffs of the Shiant Islands in the midafternoon. We will take to the Zodiacs for a coastal cruise as this small group of little islands located a few miles off the shores of Lewis is an excellent place to spot puffins, razorbills, guillemots, seals and hopefully white-tailed eagles.

Day 4

St Kilda & Stac Lee

This morning arrive at St Kilda, a remarkable uninhabited archipelago some 50 miles beyond the Outer Hebrides. Dominated by the highest cliffs and sea stacks in Britain, Hirta, St Kilda’s main island was occupied on and off for at least 2000 years, with the last 36 Gaelic speaking inhabitants evacuated at their own request in 1930. Immediately after the evacuation, the island was bought by the Marquess of Bute to protect the island’s thousands of seabirds and in 1957 it was bequeathed to the National Trust for Scotland. St Kilda is one of the few UNESCO World Heritage Sites with dual status reflecting its natural and cultural significance. The local ranger will join us on board before our expedition staff lead guided walks on the island. Later, we will cruise past one of the largest gannetries in the world at Stac Lee. The impressive stacs rise 170 metres from the sea and are home to up to 60,000 breeding pairs of northern gannet.

Day 5

Staffa, Iona & Lunga

Awake this morning off the island of Staffa, where the perpendicular cliff face features an imposing series of black basalt columns, known as the Colonnade, which have been cut by the sea into cathedral-like caverns, most notably that of Fingal’s Cave. Weather permitting, we will use our Zodiacs to explore the caves in greater detail. Later this morning we will visit Iona which has been occupied for thousands of years and has been a place of pilgrimage and Christian worship for several centuries. It was to this flat, Hebridean island that St Columba fled from Ireland in 563 AD and established a monastery, here his followers were responsible for the conversion of much of pagan Scotland and Northern England. Visit the Abbey, where no less than 62 Scottish Kings are buried, walk along the white sandy beaches or go in search of the corncrake amongst the irises. Later today we hope to drop anchor off the nearby Treshnish Isles, an archipelago of uninhabited volcanic islets. The island of Lunga is the largest and has been described as ‘a green jewel in a peacock sea.’ It is a summer nesting place for hundreds of sea birds, in particular kittiwakes, shags, fulmars, guillemots, razorbills and puffins.

Day 6

Rathlin & Ailsa Craig, Northern Ireland

Be on deck early to catch a glimpse of the magnificent cliffs to the north of the island which is home to the largest sea bird colony in Ireland. Located just a few miles from the North Antrim coast, Rathlin has been settled for more than 6000 years. Today, there are only 80 or so inhabitants whereas before the famine there were 1200. History is everywhere with historic buildings and ruins abundant on the island. Enjoy a morning guided walk which will take in the prolific sea birdlife with astonishing numbers of auks, kittiwakes and grey seals. Relax on board during an afternoon at sea before approaching the granite island of Ailsa Craig located in the Firth of Clyde. This tiny island, just 2.5 miles in circumference was once a refuge for sailors and base to a 19th century lighthouse. Today it is an RSPB reserve and home to the third largest gannet colony in Britain. In the early evening we hope to cruise by for a closer look and search for puffins, guillemots and gulls.

Day 7

Llandudno, Wales

This morning will be spent at Bodnant Garden, which is situated above the River Conwy with stunning views across Snowdonia. Begun in 1875, Bodnant Garden is the creation of four generations of Aberconways and features huge Italianate terraces and formal lawns on its upper level, with a wooded valley, stream and wild garden below. There are dramatic colours throughout the season, with herbaceous borders, roses, hydrangeas, water lilies and clematis that delight throughout the summer. Alternatively, take a drive across the Menai Straits to Anglesey and visit the RSPB’s reserve at South Stack, a beautiful but fragile heathland which is home to a large population of guillemots and razorbills and if we are lucky, we might also see some choughs. This afternoon will be free to explore Llandudno at leisure. Developed as an upmarket holiday town for Victorian visitors, this seaside town still retains much of its 19th century grandeur, with graceful architecture lining its sweeping waterfront promenade.

Day 8

Lundy

Enjoy a morning at sea as we sail south to Lundy. Those on deck in the early morning may catch a glimpse of the islands off the Pembrokeshire coast, home to some of the world’s largest gannetries with over 34,000 breeding pairs. During the afternoon discover Lundy, a remote and delightful island in the Bristol Channel. Walk along its traffic-free lanes and paths, explore the wide bays and coves by way of hanging valleys, observe the puffins nesting in abandoned rabbit warrens, have a drink at the inn and buy ‘puffin stamps’ at the island shop.

Day 9

Isles of Scilly

We have one and a half days to explore some of the islands of this enchanting and uncrowded archipelago. We plan to visit traffic-free Tresco, walking its idyllic lanes from the beach to the famous subtropical Abbey Gardens. Defying the Atlantic weather, this miracle of a garden is home to more than 20,000 species of plants from over 80 countries. Enjoy time to wander at your own pace along the paths, maybe visit the Valhalla collection of ship figureheads from ships wrecked on the islands or relax in the café. Additionally, we will explore St Agnes, the most southwesterly community in the UK, surrounded by rocks and reefs this tiny island offers marvellous coastal walks. The small island of Gugh lies across a narrow sandbar and here we find a single stone monolith called the ‘Old Man of Gugh’ dating back to the Bronze Age. We will also pay a visit to Bryher, the smallest of the inhabited Isles of Scilly, where you can wander along the tracks that cross the island amongst hedgerows and fields bursting with wildflowers. The active may wish to climb Watch Hill, where in the past islanders would keep watch for ships in distress or take a stroll to one of the beautiful beaches.

Day 10

Isles of Scilly

Day 11

Portsmouth, UK

Disembark this morning after breakfast. Transfers will be provided to Portsmouth Harbour Railway Station and London Heathrow Airport at a fixed time.

Overview

Island Life

This journey provides a wonderful opportunity to explore the splendours of Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and England and offers a unique portrait of life in the islands. It is timed for the month of May when the western shores become alive with colour, the flowers are in bloom and the birdlife prolific; the most perfect time to explore the coastal paths, see the resident wildlife and enjoy the wonderful views on offer. From the East Coast of Scotland to the Isles of Scilly, where we have a full day and a half to explore, this diverse coastline makes for a most appealing sea journey whether you be an avid gardener, birdwatcher, or simply enjoy sailing past and visiting some of the most enchanting places in the world.
Highlights
The itinerary has been designed to ensure there is an enjoyable mix of history, culture and wildlife and amongst the many highlights will be our visits to Lundy where we hope to see puffins and Rathlin Island, off the north coast of Ireland and home to hundreds of seals and nesting seabirds, where we will learn of the island’s long and eventful history. For those who appreciate time to wander around beautiful gardens, we have included visits to the splendid Bodnant Garden in Conway Valley and the subtropical Abbey Gardens on the charming island of Tresco • The voyage will be made all the more enjoyable by the use of the Zodiacs which enable landings in remote places and make the otherwise inaccessible readily available. Whilst you could always drive, travel by train and coach and reach most of the itinerary with the help of a ferry, it is much more enjoyable to join the all-suite MS Hebridean Sky and travel in comfort without any of the hassle that independent exploration of these fascinating places would entail

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Ship information

MS Hebridean Sky

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition
Length: 91 meters
Passenger Capacity: 118
Crew Capacity: 70
Built / Refurbished: 1992 / 2016
The MS Hebridean Sky is one of our three flag ships and sister vessel to the MS Island Sky and MS Caledonian Sky. All three vessels were built in the same ship yard in Italy at similar times and share the same excellent attributes that make them three of the finest small ships in the world. Formerly known as the Sea Explorer, the vessel underwent a multi-million pound refurbishment in Sweden in Spring 2016 before being re-launched as the MS Hebridean Sky.
Your Suite On board there are 59 exceptionally spacious and well-designed suites. All feature a sitting area and fourteen suites have private balconies. The feeling of luxury is enhanced by the wood panelling and brass which predominates throughout the vessel conveying the atmosphere of a private yacht. The passenger accommodation is arranged over five decks and all suites have outside views with suites on the Scott and Shackleton Decks featuring private balconies. Each suite affords considerable comfort with en-suite bathroom featuring vanity unit with sink and walk-in rainfall shower, large wardrobes, dressing table with large mirror and stool and excellent storage. There is a minifridge, flat screen television and a telephone in each suite. Refillable water bottles, towelling dressing gowns and slippers are also provided for your comfort. Additional facilities include a programmable electronic safe, hairdryer, assorted Molton Brown toiletries and individually controlled air-conditioning and heating. Soft hues and blended tones enhance the traditional maritime style making the passenger accommodation an inviting and relaxing place to be. The beds in each suite can be configured as twins or double with the exception of suite 601 and 602 which feature fixed double beds. The impressive Hebridean Suite, located on the Shackleton Deck consists of a separate bathroom and sitting room with extra large balcony stretching the length of the suite. Additional benefits of booking this marvellous suite include complimentary mini-bar stocked with your preferences and complimentary laundry.
Your Space The spacious and finely decorated public rooms on board the MS Hebridean Sky include a large lounge on the Byrd Deck featuring a selection of seating options from individual armchairs and sofas to side cushioned benches. Daily briefings given by the Cruise Director and talks from Guest Speakers and expedition staff take place in The Lounge which is fitted with the highest standard of presentation equipment including multiple screens. In addition to the Lounge, there is also The Club, located on the Mawson Deck which features the main bar where the onboard pianist plays periodically throughout the day. The Club also offers a 24-hour tea and coffee station. Towards the aft of the ship on the Mawson Deck is The Library which is well stocked with reference books pertaining to the destinations the vessel is visiting and a selection of essential reads. A collection of games and devices to access the internet via the ship’s satellite can also be found in the library. Access to the ship’s satellite Wi-Fi via your own device is complimentary on board (signal strength varies depending on location and demand). The Dining Room which can seat all guests at one sitting is located on the Amundsen Deck and is a bright and charming setting to enjoy the delicious meals on board. Outside there is a rear Lido Deck located on the Scott Deck where meals are served in warm weather under shade. Whilst heaters and blankets make dining al fresco comfortable in cooler climates. Further to this, on the top Shackleton Deck there is an observation area which offers a fantastic platform for spotting wildlife complete with deck furniture, ideal for relaxing with a book or catching up with fellow travellers. You will also find a clinic and Doctor on board and a lift that serves all decks. Additionally there is a small hairdressers with appointments made on request.
Your Dining It is quite a task to create a dining experience as that found on board our Sky vessels when you are cruising in far-flung corners of the globe, indeed it takes a team of highly talented chefs to deliver fresh, varied dishes no matter where you are at sea. Fortunately, our catering teams are well adapted to the world of small ship cruising where no two days are the same and the menus are often scheduled and tailored around the days’ excursions. With only one sitting and a maximum of just over 100 passengers, the cuisine on board is of a consistent superior quality that befits such vessels. Where possible and when it meets their high standards, our accomplished chefs will obtain local produce in markets. Such purchases enhance the well-stocked larders and enable the chefs on board to exhibit their culinary skills and bring a local touch to the varied menus, emphasising the international expertise of the chefs on board. Afternoon tea and pre-dinner canapés take place every day in either the comfort of the Lounge or out on the Lido Deck when the weather is favourable. Tea and coffee are also available 24 hours a day. Special diets can be catered for with sufficient notice. In keeping with the informal atmosphere on board, when dining you are able to choose your seating arrangements at your leisure. Whether that be joining a table of four to six other passengers outside on the Lido Deck in the evening’s sunshine or whether you prefer to enjoy meals in the à la carte restaurant. For those travelling alone, our onboard friendly restaurant staff will take care to ensure you are seated with other like-minded travellers. In the main elegant dining room, breakfast is served buffet-style, with certain items cooked to order on request. Lunch and dinner are à la carte with an excellent choice of dishes, with the menu reflecting the daily catch or local delicacies. To enhance your dining experience even further a selection of wines are included with both meals and there is also a comprehensive wine list with a wide selection of new and old world wines from which to choose. The onboard catering and restaurant staff are experienced at sea and enthuse a passion for superb service. Whether it be ensuring you have an outdoor blanket as you enjoy the crisp sea breeze on the Lido Deck or sharing their knowledge of the characteristics of the days’ wine selections, you will experience a service on board like no other. You may also enjoy sumptuous barbeques on deck whilst at times, the chef will make your dish to order at special pasta or stir fry stations.
For Your Comfort The MS Hebridean Sky is equipped with the latest safety, navigation and communications equipment along with roll stabilizers to minimize the ship’s motion. During your voyage we hope to offer the opportunity to visit the Captain and Officers on the Bridge to check the vessels progress by charts and learn more about your journey. There is also a dedicated channel on your television in your suite showing the routing of the vessel along with technical information and estimated times of arrival and departure from port. On board you will also find a clinic and Doctor and a lift that serves all decks. Smoking on board is restricted to a specific area on deck.
Contact
Booking
Luxury Expedition
Caledonian Sky
22.05.2021
01.06.2021
10
Northern Europe, Hebridean Island Odyssey
Fare from € 5.850
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Travelroute
Day 1

Oban, Scotland

Embark the MS Caledonian Sky this afternoon. Transfers will be provided from Glasgow Airport and Glasgow Central Train Station at a fixed time. Sail early this evening.

Day 2

Gigha & Colonsay

Gigha is a place apart; heathercovered hills, deserted beaches and a single lane verged with wildflowers that meander for some six miles between cottages and farms. Privately owned by its 120 inhabitants, it is a gem of a place and somewhere not easily forgotten. After landing by Zodiac, we will walk to the gardens of Achamore House where the Horlick family have created a lovely and eclectic garden with their collection of azaleas, rhododendrons and exotic plants. After lunch we will explore the island of Colonsay, with her craggy, heather-backed hills and sparse woodland yet impressive array of plant and birdlife. Near Colonsay House, built in 1722 by Malcolm MacNeil and bought by Lord Strathcona in 1904, we will visit the attractively dilapidated wooded gardens which protect the tiny, enigmatic 8th century St Oran’s Cross.

Day 3

Mingulay

Today we explore Mingulay, a remote island at the tip of South Uist which, at nearly 1600 acres, is the largest of the group of islands south of Barra. Its towering cliffs and stacks face the Atlantic while the east side slopes gradually down to the sandy beach of Mingulay Bay. Despite there being a continuous population on the island for at least two thousand years, evacuation began in 1907 and the island was completely abandoned in 1912. Ruins of the village remain close to the shore which we will explore on a guided walk. The islands are also a nature reserve with important breeding populations of razorbills, guillemots, puffins, fulmars and shags. Enjoy the afternoon at sea.

Day 4

St Kilda & Stac Lee

Awake this morning in St Kilda, a remarkable uninhabited archipelago some fifty miles beyond the Outer Hebrides. Dominated by the highest cliffs and sea stacks in Britain, Hirta, St Kilda’s main island was occupied on and off for at least two thousand years, with the last 36 Gaelic speaking inhabitants evacuated at their own request in 1930. Immediately after the evacuation, the island was bought by the Marquess of Bute to protect the island’s thousands of seabirds including puffin and fulmars, and in 1957 it was bequeathed to The National Trust for Scotland. St Kilda is one of only two dozen UNESCO World Heritage Sites with dual status reflecting its natural and cultural significance. The local ranger will join us on board before our expedition staff lead a number of guided walks on the island. Later, cruise past one of the largest gannetries in the world, Stac Lee.

Day 5

North Rona & Sula Sgeir

Spend the day around North Rona, an isolated island some fifty miles north of Cape Wrath. The last islanders left North Rona in 1844 and today it is home to thirteen species of breeding seabirds including large colonies of great black-backed gulls, great skuas and puffins. There is also a large population of grey seals which we hope to observe on a Zodiac cruise. If weather permits, the MS Caledonian Sky will cruise past the gannet colony on Sula Sgeir, home to over 5000 breeding pairs and renowned as the least visited national nature reserve in Britain.

Day 6

Handa & Isle Martin

Arrive over breakfast at Handa where we will use our Zodiacs to explore the magnificent sea cliffs of Torridonian sandstone which rise from the Atlantic. The island comes alive each summer when nearly 100,000 seabirds gather to breed including internationally important numbers of guillemot, razorbill, puffins and great skua. We will return to the MS Caledonian Sky for lunch and set sail for Isle Martin. Eilean Mhartainn in Scots Gaelic, Isle Martin is an uninhabited island in Loch Broom, on the west coast of Scotland. During the 1980s and 1990s, it became the site of a reforestation experiment by ecologists with native woodlands planted throughout and these are now flourishing and improving soil fertility and biodiversity. Then in 1999 the island became one of the first handovers of land to community ownership. We will be offered a very warm welcome by volunteers from the community trust and learn about the work they do on the island; promoting the landscape, community and traditions.

Day 7

Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides

Awake today in the Isle of Lewis. On leaving the island capital of Stornoway, this morning’s tour takes you across the island to the beautiful west coast and to Callanish. Described as Scotland’s Stonehenge, the Callanish Standing Stones date from around 3000BC. There are a total of 32 stones in a circular and avenue design. The stones stand like a petrified forest on the flat top of a peninsula which reaches out into East Loch Roag. Visit the excellent visitor centre to learn more about the site and venture out amongst the stones themselves to experience their mysterious atmosphere. Continue around the west coast to the site of Dun Carloway Pictish Broch. Probably built sometime in the last century BC, it would have served as an occasionally defensible residence for an extended family complete with accommodation for animals at ground floor level. We then head north to Gearrannan Blackhouse Village, a reconstructed settlement of traditional black houses where people and animals lived in close proximity. The houses are made using dry stone masonry and have thatched roofs, distinctively weighted down with rocks. Visit the small museum, enjoy a display of a typical crofting activity such as weaving and take in the views at this dramatic site on the wild Atlantic coast. Return to the ship for lunch and this afternoon is at leisure for individual exploration. We will moor overnight and hope to have local musicians come on board this evening.

Day 8

Inverewe & Shiant Islands

This morning we will visit one of Scotland’s premier gardens, Inverewe. This botanical garden in the northwest Highlands presents an amazing collection of exotic trees and shrubs that are sheltered by well-positioned windbreaks of native pine. After a guided tour of the gardens, we will return to the MS Caledonian Sky for lunch. This afternoon we will board the Zodiacs for a cruise around the spectacular basalt cliffs of the Shiant Islands, a group of little islands located a few miles off the shores of Lewis. This is an excellent place to spot puffins, razorbills, guillemots, seals and hopefully white-tailed eagles.

Day 9

Loch Scavaig & Canna

Wake this morning in Loch Scavaig on the island of Skye. Just beyond is the freshwater Loch Corruisk with its breathtakingly beautiful view over the Cuillins. This is great walking country and our expedition team will run a series of hikes for all interests and for those who prefer a less energetic afternoon our Zodiacs will explore the coast looking out for seals. Enjoy lunch as we sail over to Canna. Strategically placed between the mountains of Rum and the Outer Hebrides, the island and its adjoining neighbour, Sanday, are bound together like some rare text that reveals over 60 million years of Hebridean geology and history. They have an amazingly rich archaeological landscape with remains dating to all periods of settled occupation in Scotland. Canna is run as a single farm and bird sanctuary by the National Trust for Scotland and enjoys the best harbour in the Small Isles, a hornshaped haven. The fertile soil and its diversity of habitats mean that the island has an incredibly rich plant life with 248 native flowering plants recorded. We will see Canna House and wander across grassy basalt plateaus to the 600 foot cliffs on the north shore.

Day 10

Staffa, Iona & Lunga

This morning we hope to drop anchor off Staffa, the south side where the perpendicular rock face features an imposing series of black basalt columns, known as the Colonnade, which have been cut by the sea into cathedralesque caverns, most notably Fingal’s Cave. From here we sail over to Iona which has been occupied for thousands of years and has been a place of pilgrimage and Christian worship for several centuries. It was to this flat, Hebridean island that St Columba fled from Ireland in 563 and established a monastery. Here his followers were responsible for the conversion of much of pagan Scotland and Northern England. No less than 62 Scottish Kings are buried in the Abbey. Visit the Abbey or perhaps walk along the white sandy beaches or go in search of the corncrake amongst the irises. In the afternoon, weather permitting, we will use our Zodiacs to explore the Treshnish Isles, an archipelago of uninhabited volcanic islets. The island of Lunga is the largest of the Treshnish Isles in Argyll and Bute. Of volcanic origin, Lunga has been described as ‘a green jewel in a peacock sea’ and is a summer nesting-place for hundreds of sea birds.

Day 11

Oban

Disembark this morning after breakfast. Transfers will be provided to Glasgow International Airport and Glasgow Central Train Station at a fixed time.

Overview

Hebridean Island Odyssey

You can travel the world visiting all manner of exotic and wonderful places without realising that some of the finest scenery, fascinating history and most endearing people may be close to home. Nowhere is this truer than around Scotland’s magnificent coastline, an indented landscape of enormous natural splendour with offshore islands forming stepping stones into the Atlantic. The sheer diversity of the landscapes and lifestyles will amaze you, as will the spirit and warmth of the small communities we will encounter. With our fleet of Zodiacs we are able to visit some of the most remote and uninhabited islands that surround the Scottish Coast including Mingulay, Lunga and St Kilda as well as the small island community of Iona.
This is not a cruise in the conventional sense, more an exploration with 100 or so passengers who wish to enjoy the peace and tranquillity of the islands. Learn something of their history, see the abundant bird and marine life, but above all revel in the timeless enchantment that these islands exude to all those who appreciate the natural world. Having arranged hundreds of small ship cruises around Scotland, we have learned that everyone takes something different from the experience. We are indeed fortunate in having such marvellous places so close to home. Now, more than ever there is a great appreciation for the peace, beauty and culture of this special corner of the UK.
Highlights
Discover Gigha & Colonsay • Travel to Mingulay • Explore St Kilda & Stac Lee • Enjoy North Rona & Sula Sgeir • Discover Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides • Visit Loch Scavaig & Canna • Explore Staffa, Iona & Lunga

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Ship information

Caledonian Sky

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition
Length: 90 meters
Passenger Capacity: 114
Crew Capacity: 70
Built: 1991 / refurbished 2018
The MS Caledonian Sky accommodates a maximum of 114 passengers in 57 spacious outside suites. Many have walk-in wardrobes and some feature tub baths. There will be seven categories of suites and sixteen suites will have private balconies. For those familiar with the MS Island Sky she will feel like a second home, although there are some differences. The dining room, lounge, Lido Deck and bar are all similar. However, the ‘Club’ on the MS Caledonian Sky has been transported to the very top deck. Here, there is a library and bar which leads out on to a lovely forward deck. The ‘Club’ has wonderful views with ceiling to floor windows.
If you like the MS Island Sky, we are sure you will also approve of her sister. And, of course it is important that we offer the very best of facilities. However, equally as important are the staff on board whether they are the vessel’s crew or our own expedition staff. Noble Caledonia’s reputation has been built on providing the very best in all areas. Their crew of 70 not only offer an excellent service they are also noted for their kindness and attention to detail. A well run ship with a warm atmosphere is what we are known for, and it is because most of our crew have been with us for many years that we are able to engender such an atmosphere.
Your Suite
On board there are 57 exceptionally spacious and well-designed suites, 23 of which have private balconies located on the Promenade or Bridge Decks. Following a comprehensive refurbishment of the suites in November 2018, the suites on each deck have their own colour theme utilising fabrics from companies such as Osbourne & Little and Zimmer & Rohde. Soft hues, blended tones and the classic contemporary fabrics enhance the traditional maritime style making the passenger accommodation an inviting and relaxing place to be. Each suite exudes great character and grandeur with wood panelling and brass features found throughout. The large suites are arranged over four decks and all have outside facing views. All suites feature a sitting area complete with coffee table, armchairs and flat screen televisions (DVD players and DVDs can be borrowed from reception for use in your suite).

Your space

The spacious and finely decorated public rooms on board the MS Caledonian Sky include a large lounge featuring comfortable seating. Daily briefings given by the onboard team and talks from Guest Speakers take place in the Main Lounge which is fitted with multiple screens. For your convenience it is also possible to follow the onboard lectures from the comfort of your suite. Also in the Lounge is a 24-hour tea and coffee station along with an elegant bar where the onboard pianist plays periodically throughout the day. In addition to the Main Lounge on the Caledonian Deck, there is the recently refurbished Lounge on the Panorama Deck which has a bar, library and further spacious seating arrangements, ideal for watching the world go by as you cruise to your next destination. The Travel Library is the perfect place to relax with a good book and is well stocked with reference books pertaining to the destinations the vessel is visiting and a collection of essential reads. A selection of games and devices to access the internet via the ship’s satellite can also be found in the library. Access to the ship’s satellite Wi-Fi via your own device is complimentary on board (signal strength varies depending on location and demand). The Dining Room which can seat all guests at one sitting is located on the Castle Deck. Outside there is a rear Lido Deck which is complete with deck tables and chairs where meals are served in warm weather under shade and often occasions such as sail away parties and barbeques are held here.
On the Panorama Deck towards the front of the vessel there is an additional Observation Deck, complete with bar and comfortable cushioned deck furniture for sun bathing, relaxing with a book or catching up with fellow travellers. On the Promenade Deck there is also a small gymnasium featuring a treadmill, bicycle and cross trainer, and a hairdressers with appointments made on request. For your wellbeing, there is a clinic with Doctor on board and a lift which serves all decks.

Your dining
With only one sitting and a maximum of just over 100 passengers, the quality of cuisine will be of a consistent superior quality. Where possible and when it meets his high standards, our accomplished chef will obtain local produce in markets or buy the catch of the day from a passing fishing boat. Such purchases enhance the well stocked larders and bring a local touch to the varied menus. In the main elegant dining room, breakfast is served buffet-style, with certain items cooked to order and lunch and dinner is à la carte. When weather permits, breakfast, a buffet-style lunch and dinner are also served on deck. To enhance your dining experience even further a selection of wines are included with lunch and dinner. Afternoon tea is served in the lounge and tea and coffee are available 24 hours. With sufficient notice, most diets can be catered for on board.

For your comfort
MS Caledonian Sky is equipped with the latest safety, navigation and communications equipment along with roll stabilizers to minimize the ship’s motion. As is the joy of small ship cruising, during your voyage, we hope to offer the opportunity to visit the Captain and Officers on the Bridge to check the vessels progress by charts and learn more about your journey (subject to weather or security conditions). There is a navigation channel on the television in your suite showing the routing of the vessel. On board you will also find a clinic and doctor and a lift that serves all decks. Smoking on board is restricted to a specific area on deck.
Gratuities
Unlike many other cruise vessels, onboard the MS Caledonian Sky you do not need to worry about tipping staff as we have included them in your holiday price. In addition we tip all their guides and drivers along the way, thereby taking away the hassle of always having to remember to have some small change with you.
Contact
Booking
Luxury Small Ship Cruise
Silver Origin
22.05.2021
29.05.2021
7
Latin America, Galápagos Islands Luxury Cruise
Fare from € 9,900
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Travelroute
Day 1

San Cristobal and Kicker Rock

Like so many of the islands in the Galápagos, San Cristobal is formed by dormant volcanoes. It lies to the east of the archipelago and is one of the oldest islands in the group. Approximately 6,000 people live on the island, making their living from tourism, fishing, in government offices, or off the rich volcanic soils with some limited farming existing in the highlands. Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on the southwestern tip of the island is the capital city of the Galápagos Islands. A statue of Charles Darwin graces the harbor, marking one of the first places he likely stepped ashore in the 1830s.
Kicker Rock is the vertical remnant of a former tuff cone less than 5 kilometers to the west of San Cristobal. Both its Spanish name “Leon Dormido” (Sleeping Lion) and English name Kicker Rock imply that it is one rock only -when in fact it is a larger one 300 meters long by 100 meters wide with a maximum height of approximately 150 meters and next to it an obelisk-like rock separated by a narrow channel some 20 meters deep. When approaching Kicker Rock, Blue-footed Boobies, Nazca Boobies and frigatebirds can be observed in the air, while sea lions can be seen along the shore. Snorkelers and divers have reported manta rays, hammerhead sharks and turtles. The Spanish name implies that the geological formation seen from the south resembles a sleeping lion. An interesting explanation for the English name suggests that James Colnett in 1794 likened it to famous landmarks in Portsmouth.

Day 2

Isla Bartolome and Buccaneer Cove, Santiago

Our ship anchors in sight of the volcanic moonscape of Isla Bartolomé, at Sullivan Bay. Zodiacs bring guests ashore to ascend a boardwalk of 388 steps. Passing through the arid volcanic landscape provides a chance to watch for lava lizards, Galapagos Hawks, and Blue-footed Boobies. However, the climber’s ultimate reward is one of the most beautiful panoramas in all of the Galapagos Islands – the view towards Pinnacle Rock with black, volcanic cones of Baltra, Daphne Major and Daphne Minor in the distance. On the way down watch how the sunlight catches the green of pioneering plant species in stark contrast against dark volcanic rock, and look forward to time swimming and snorkeling from the golden beach at Bahia Dorada.

Day 3

Punta Vicente Roca (Isabela) and Punta Espinoza (Fernandina)

Punta Vicente Roca is one of the marine sites Isabela Island has to offer. On the southern side of Ecuador Volcano, the tip of land on the western end of Isabela is named after Vicente Ramon Roca, President of Ecuador from 1845-49, who as Prefect of Guayas had proposed the Ecuadorian annexation of the Galapagos Islands in 1831. The geological formations, the underwater caves and lava tubes offer fascinating views of the coastline. The South Equatorial Countercurrent hits this part of the archipelago from the west and the water offers abundant food sources for different marine life and seabirds. It is normal to see Pacific green turtles, but sharks, rays, whales and dolphins can also be expected, apart from a small colony of fur seals. Blue-footed Boobies, Nazca Boobies, Brown Noddies and other seabirds nest in the cliffs and both the endemic Galapagos Penguins and Flightless Cormorants have established small colonies nearby. Marine iguanas also like this area because of the rich variety of seaweeds growing underwater along the western coast of Isabela. As a marine site, deepwater snorkeling is also possible at Punta Vicente Roca.
With the gentle slopes of La Cumbre volcano in the distance, the low, lava-forged coast of Punta Espinoza on Fernandina Island is a spectacular sight. Hundreds of marine iguanas rest on the black rock of recent lava flows absorbing heat from the stone and defending their territories against one another. Galapagos sea lions and their pups also take shelter here, resting on the beach and playing in the shallow tide pools sprinkled along the coast. Walk past high sandy areas where marine iguanas lay their eggs and along low, shallow mangrove ponds ringed with bright red Sally Lightfoot crabs and Flightless Cormorants drying their stubby wings in the sunshine.

Day 4

Tagus Cove and Elizabeth Bay

Tagus Cove is bordered by a steep rocky coastline and has for centuries offered shelter for ships and yachts. The cove is named after the British frigate HMS Tagus visiting the Galapagos in 1814. Already by the 1830s other ships had their visits recorded by painting or scratching their name onto the rocks. On approach Galapagos Penguins and Flightless Cormorants –both birds mainly found on Isabela’s west coast and neighboring Fernandina- are often seen. From the landing a trail through an incense tree forest leads past Darwin Lake to a viewpoint on top of a splatter cone. During the hike several land birds including Medium Ground-Finches, Galapagos Hawks, Yellow Warblers as well as Large-billed and Vermilion Flycatchers are often present. Brown Noddies and Blue-footed Boobies prefer the rocks along the shore.
Elizabeth Bay is one of the marine sites on Isabela’s west coast. South of Alcedo Volcano and north of Sierra Negra, Elizabeth Bay is found at Isabela’s narrowest east-west extension where the lava flows of these two volcanoes have connected each other. Elizabeth Bay’s shores show mangroves and specifically the easternmost part, a cove which can only be entered via a narrow channel, has red, white and black mangroves. Different animals prefer different parts of Elizabeth Bay. Las Marielas, three rocks at the entrance to the bay, are favored by Blue-footed Boobies, Flightless Cormorants and Galapagos Penguins as a resting place, while the mangrove area is preferred by Great Blue Herons for hunting or the Magnificent Frigatebirds for perching. The bay is used by turtles, rays and even sharks for feeding or resting. The shallow water and the root system of the mangroves in the small inlet allow smaller fish to hide from bigger predators.

Day 5

Post Office Bay (Floreana), Champion Islet, Floreana and Punta Cormorant (Floreana)

Floreana’s Post Office Bay has received its name as the site was used to leave mail for retrieval by others who were thought to stop at the Galapagos Islands or might be heading for the addressee’s direction. First mentioned by Porter in 1813 as “Hathaway’s Postoffice”, HMS Beagle’s captain FitzRoy stated that it was not in use in 1835 as the island was already settled at that time. Floreana had been the first island to be settled by Ecuadorians in 1832. Today a barrel instead of the original box is used by visitors who leave their own postcards and retrieve mail for hand-delivery. Apart from the beach and mail barrel the bay offers good swimming and snorkeling. The area holds remains of a failed Norwegian fish canning plant and settlement dating back to the 1920s. A lava tube in the vicinity can also be explored. Although Floreana is inhabited, the number of residents is reduced because of the difficult access to water. A track from Post Office Bay connects with the only road from Puerto Velazco Ibarra on the west coast to a spring in the highlands.
Champion Islet is a small islet some 700 meters off the northeast coast of Floreana. It is one of four marine sites surrounding Floreana and offers excellent deepwater snorkeling opportunities. Curious sea lions approach the snorkelers while turtles slowly swim by and sharks, sting rays, and a high diversity of colorful fishes can usually be seen. During a Zodiac cruise around Champion Islet not only seabirds such as Nazca Boobies, Swallow-tailed Gulls, or Red-billed Tropicbirds will be seen, it is also possible to spot the rare Floreana Mockingbird.
Floreana Island’s northernmost point is called Punta Cormorant – named after the British naval vessel HMS Cormorant and dating back to the late 19th century. From the landing beach a short track leads to a shallow lagoon that is famous for its flamingos. The brilliantly pink birds skim the salty waters for shrimp and tend to chicks on the nest. The trail then scales a low hillside through scattered Palo Santo trees to reveal an idyllic white-sand beach on the other side of the point. Standing at the edge of the lapping waves, you might spot mammoth female sea turtles hauling themselves out of the sea to lay eggs in the sugar sand dunes that lay high above the tide line. Before returning to the landing site your guides may also point out White-cheeked Pintails, Blue-footed Boobies, Yellow Warblers, and Medium and Small Ground Finches.

Day 6

Santa Cruz Highlands and Fausto Llerena Breeding Center, Puerto Ayora

Los Gemelos (The Twins) is a visitor site in the Santa Cruz highlands. Found some 15 kilometers northwest of Puerto Ayora, the road leading from Puerto Ayora in the south of Santa Cruz to Itabaca in the north dissects the twin pit craters. Pit craters are formed when the roof of an underground void collapses. The smaller pit crater is on the eastern side of the road, while the larger one is on the western side. See from above, the two openings in the ground are not at all identical. Their layout might imply an elongated magma chamber or a lava tube leading further west and the larger twin actually having formerly been two small pit craters whose connecting wall collapsed as well. Trails through a Scalesia forest not only give access to good views of the pit craters, but also permit to observe some of the smaller land birds. Vermilion Flycatchers, Yellow Warblers, Galapagos Doves, Medium Ground Finches and several other finch species can often be seen there.
Silver Origin will anchor in front of Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz, where the prestigious Charles Darwin Research Station is located. The station also houses the Fausto Llerena Breeding Center for giant tortoises and land iguanas where guides interpret the centre’s captive breeding and reintroduction programs. In addition to these star species, throughout the station there are huge prickly pear cactus trees being fed upon by the pretty Galapagos Cactus Finch. To round out the stay in Puerto Ayora, enjoy free time in town where local artists have created charming art galleries and corner cafés.

Day 7

Cerro Dragon (Santa Cruz), Isla Guy Fawkes and Bahía Borrero, Santa Cruz

Cerro Dragón’s land iguanas once played an important part in a conservation program headed by the Charles Darwin Foundation and the Galapagos National Park. When the reptiles’ numbers declined in the 1970s, some animals were taken to breed in captivity and were released back into undeveloped areas. Today, it is an honor to see the success of this program firsthand at Cerro Dragón. Walk inland on a trail past small saltwater lagoons that periodically feature flamingos, to see the reintroduced animals. In a periodic local phenomenon, during rainier times the salinity in the lagoons drops with the inflow of freshwater. As a consequence crustacean populations decline, which in turn means the shorebirds become scarce.
In the northern area of Santa Cruz Island, Bahía Borrero is a beautiful white coralline beach used as a nesting site by Green Sea turtles. Behind the dunes, we have a forest of typical vegetation from the arid zone: Palo Santo, Leather leaf, and Salty bushes. This vegetation welcomes Yellow Warblers, and some of the most characteristic species of Darwin Finches, such as the Common Cactus Finch or the Small Ground Finch. This extinct volcano, due to its altitude, shows all the different zones of vegetation, changing from the littoral to the arid, and then with more moisture into the humid zone, to end in the dry pampa zone. It is an impressive landscape to enjoy while you swim in the turquoise waters of the bay or have a nice relaxing walk along the beach.

Day 8

Baltra

Disembarkation.
Baltra Island, also known as South Seymour, is truly the entrance to the Galapagos Islands. Despite not being considered as part of the National Park proper, Baltra definitely offers a taste of the weird and wonderful nature that thrives on the islands. The island is located in the central part of the archipelago. At just eight sq. mi it is one of smallest islands, yet its flat, volcanic rock surface and central location in the archipelago makes it an ideal place for one of the islands’ two airports. The airport was built by the US Air Force, who used it as an army base during WWII. As a travel destination in itself it offers few attractions, and all travellers who come here are just passing through, either on either way to or from the islands. There is no tourism infrastructure (save a few agencies that offer tours of the islands) or shops on Baltra and any purchases that you might wish to make should be done at the airport if they can. However, land iguanas and Galapagos finches are popular sights, and the iguanas are often seen running across the runway itself. As you cross the Itabaca Channel to or from Santa Cruz, be on the lookout for some other Galapagian locals: giant turtles and playful sea lions completely oblivious to the humans around.

Ship information

Galápagos Islands Luxury Cruise

Including return flights between Ecuador and Galápagos.

The weird and wonderful Galápagos Islands are definitely contenders for the world best travel destination. These are the islands where the animals look at humans curiously, rather than the other way around! Inspiring and educational, each island has its own species and strengths, ranging from miles of dramatic coastline to nesting colonies of endemic birds. The islands may be small, but be prepared for some big surprises! Ticking off all 15 species of the Galapagos Big 15, this seven day voyage is perfect for curious cruisers! From marine iguanas to Galapagos Hawks, to the iconic blue-footed boobie, no other place on Earth can compare to the Galapagos’ fusion of flora and fauna. Join us to explore the volcanic landscapes that time forgot, discover unique wildlife both above and below the sea, drinking in the drama and depth of natural history along the way.
Highlights

Guided Zodiac, land and sea tours, and shoreside activities led by the Expeditions Team • Enrichment lectures by a highly qualified Expeditions Team • Isla Bartolomé & Santiago Island • Fernandina Island, Isabela Island and more • Amazing Wildlife & Snorkelling

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Ship information

Silver Origin

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition
Length: 101 metres
Passenger Capacity: 100
Crew: 90
Built: 2020

The first destination specific ship built by Silversea, Silver Origin is the height of experiential travel in the Galápagos. Never before have the islands been so superbly presented: a team of Ecuadorian national expert guides, the highest crew-to-guest ratio in the Galápagos, 8 Zodiacs, seamless hybrid spaces that offer an extraordinary voyage – for extraordinary people. All-suite accommodation, Horizon Balconies, butler service, sophisticated interiors, interactive basecamp, Ecuadorian inspired cuisine … no aspect of Silver Origin has been left to chance. The most environmentally conscious ship we have ever built, take a vertical leap and transform your idea of travel with Silver Origin.

Contact
Booking
Small Yacht Cruise
Lord of the Glens
24.05.2021
31.05.2021
7
Northern Europe, Heart Of The Highlands
Fare from € 2,150
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Travelroute
Day 1

Inverness

Arrive in Inverness, and embark Lord of the Glens. Tonight, enjoy a welcome reception and dinner on board while docked in Inverness.

Day 2

Culloden and Caledonian Canal

This morning visit Culloden, the infamous battlefield where “Bonnie” Prince Charlie’s Jacobite forces were defeated in 1746, and then see the ancient standing stones of Clava Cairns. Set sail this afternoon on the Caledonian Canal, built between 1803 and 1822 to connect Loch Ness with the Great Glen’s three other lochs. Enter Loch Ness, cruise past the romantic ruins of Urquhart Castle. Ascend an impressive flight of locks that runs through the heart of Fort Augustus. Moor this evening at Fort Augustus.

Day 3

Laggan Avenue and Glenfinnan

Sail through the tree-lined section known as Laggan Avenue and into Loch Lochy and on until we descend Neptune’s Staircase, a set of eight interconnected locks, to the village of Corpach, nestled in the shadow of Ben Nevis, Great Britain’s highest mountain. In the afternoon we take the West Highland railway line over the renowned viaduct to beautiful Glenfinnan, surrounded by mountains. Moor overnight at Corpach.

Day 4

Oban

Today we enter the ocean, passing mysterious lochs and islands till we reach Oban, the seafood capital of the Highlands. Join us for a walk up to McCaig's Tower dominating the skyline of the town with great views of the Western Isles. Overnight at Oban.

Day 5

Isle of Iona and Tobermory

This morning we sail to Craignure for the excursion to the Isle of Iona, with a pause in front of Duart Castle for photographs. Visit Iona, the last resting place of some 50 Scottish Kings and where St. Columba introduced Christianity to Britain. Later sail to Tobermory, again on the Isle of Mull. Tobermory’s most striking feature is the gaily painted houses that line the waterfront originally built by the British Fisheries Company to house its workers for £20 each. Moor Mull overnight.

Day 6

Eigg and Inverie

Sail north from Tobermory to tiny Eigg this morning, catching glimpses of the islands of the Inner Hebrides along the way. At Eigg you can get a sense of what life is like for the roughly 90 people who live on this island community. Look for marine animals and birdlife, including Atlantic seals, minke whales, dolphins, porpoises and a variety of seabirds. Then sail to the town of Inverie in Loch Nevis, where you can have a drink at the most remote pub in the British Isles.

Day 7

Kyle

Early morning sail across the Sound of Sleat to Armadale and the Isle of Skye. Visit the Clan Donald Centre. Later sail to Kyle of Lochalsh from where we visit Eilean Donan Castle and Plockton. Evening Farewell Reception and Dinner. Overnight in Kyle.

Day 8

Kyle

Disembark in Kyle of Lochalsh after breakfast and drive to Inverness.

Overview

Heart Of The Highlands

This seven night voyage on board the deluxe ‘Lord of the Glens’ encompasses the main highlights of a voyage through the very heart of the Scottish Highlands introducing the interested traveller to the intricate and endlessly fascinating inland waters of the Caledonian Canal, the glistening waters of Loch Linnhe, the Sound of Mull, the Sound of Sleat and finally to Kyle Rhea with calls at Inverness, Fort Augustus, Laggan, Corpach (Fort William), Craignure (Isle of Mull), Iona, Tobermory, Isle of Eigg, Armadale on the Isle of Skye as well as nearby Loch Nevis to remote Inverie before ‘voyage end’ at Kyle of Lochalsh.

The arrangement will appeal to those seeking great natural beauty, excellent cuisine as well as sumptuous accommodations. The tariff provides for a full Scottish breakfast, luncheon, and a splendid dinner. At most ports of call there is something to interest and fascinate the weary traveller, but alternatively you are free simply to escape, perhaps read a book, and sip a glass of wine as the glories of the landscape slip by.

Highlights

Visit Culloden, the infamous battlefield where “Bonnie” Prince Charlie’s Jacobite forces were defeated in 1746 • Cruise past the romantic ruins of Urquhart Castle • Glide along the tree-lined canal known as Laggan Avenue • Visit the Isle of Iona, the last resting place of some 50 Scottish Kings and where St. Columba introduced Christianity to Britain • Look for marine animals and birdlife, including Atlantic seals, minke whales, dolphins, porpoises and a variety of seabirds

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Ship information

Lord of the Glens

Vessel Type: Luxury Small Ship

Length: 42 meters

Passenger Capacity: 54

Crew Capacity: 18

Built: 1985 Reconstructed & Renovated since 2000

Until recently, size-limiting locks prevented travellers from seeing the Highlands from the remarkable vantage point of the inland waterway that links Scotland's most famous lochs. Now, with the style of a classic luxury yacht, the 48-guest Lord of the Glens journeys through this spectacular countryside in spectacular style.

The moment you step aboard the Lord of the Glens you are surrounded by the rich mahogany finishes of the reception area and lobby. The ship is magnificently appointed and brings to mind that one is in a stately country manor rather than a five-star ship.

Cabins: Cabins are tasteful, comfortable and spacious with wonderful outside views. Most cabins have large picture windows (four have two large portholes). Facilities include a private bathroom with shower, individually controlled air-conditioning and heating, satellite television, music system, hairdryer, telephone, safety deposit box, bathrobes and toiletries.

Public Areas: With all round teak decks, hardwood finished interiors and fine fabrics, the Lord of the Glens offers a stylish and relaxing ambience. The two lounges and two open-air viewing areas are social hubs aboard shop, and the small library and cozy bar are a refuge for the more solitary.

Meals: Served in the elegant single-seating Dining Room. Chefs create healthy, delicious cuisine served by an attentive staff.

Contact
Booking
Small Expedition Yacht
Coral Adventurer
24.05.2021
03.06.2021
10
Australia and NZ, Ancient Lands of the Kimberley
Fare from € 6.850
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Travelroute
Day 1

Depart Broome

Board your Coral Expeditions ship at 4.00pm where there is time to settle into your stateroom before our 5:00pm departure. Take the time to become acquainted with all the facilities onboard as we cruise northwards towards Cape Leveque.

As dusk falls meet your fellow travellers, the Captain and crew for the Captain’s Welcome Drinks.

Day 2

Lacepede Islands

The Lacepede Islands are a protected class-A nature reserve and are significant as a seabird nesting rookery for brown boobies and roseate terns. Other species often sighted at the Lacepedes include Australian Pelicans, frigate birds, egrets and gulls. The four low-lying islands are also an important breeding and nesting habitat for green turtles.

If weather and tide conditions are suitable, we will explore the lagoons by Xplorer and Zodiac tender vessels.

Day 3

Horizontal Falls and Buccaneer Archipelago

he Horizontal Falls are one of the Kimberley’s biggest attractions and are a result of the mammoth 11m tides the Kimberley is renowned for. Naturalist David Attenborough described the Horizontal Falls as ‘one of the greatest natural wonders of the world.’

The Horizontal Falls are created as the ocean thunders through a narrow gorge in the McLarty Ranges. Water builds up on one side and is forcibly pushed through the bottleneck, creating a rushing horizontal waterfall of swiftly flowing seawater. Riding the rapids on our Zodiac inflatable tenders is one of the highlights of our Kimberley expedition cruises.

Talbot Bay is at the heart of the Buccaneer Archipelago, where rocks on the 800 or so islands are estimated at over 2 billion years old. At Cyclone Creek, you will see evidence of massive geological forces in the impressive rock formations and cruise through the Iron Islands, past Koolan Island, before enjoying sunset drinks at Nares Point.

Day 4

Doubtful Bay and Raft Point

Raft Point guards the entrance to Doubtful Bay, a vast body of sheltered water which harbours significant sites such as the ancient Wandjina rock art galleries, considered some of the finest in the Kimberley. If a Traditional Owner guide is available to accompany us, we will be able to visit the galleries.

Doubtful Bay is the traditional country of the Worrora people who follow the Wandjina, their god, law-maker and creator. Images of Wandjina are found throughout the Kimberley, recording their stories, knowledge and culture in stone.

Other sites we aim to visit in Doubtful Bay include the mighty Sale River, Steep Island and Ruby Falls at Red Cone Creek.

Day 5

Montgomery Reef

Montgomery Reef is a biologically diverse area covering over 400sq km and was named by Phillip Parker King. Twice daily, as the sea recedes in mammoth 11m tides, Montgomery Reef rises from the Indian Ocean in a cascade of rushing water revealing a flat-topped reef pockmarked with rockpools and rivulets.

As the reef emerges, we get up close in our Xplorer and Zodiac inflatable tenders to witness the spectacle as our Expedition Team share their knowledge on the formation of the reef and the myriad wildlife. Opportunistic birds take advantage of the emerging reef, feeding on marine life left exposed in rock pools. Turtles and dolphins too are also attracted to feeding opportunities as the ocean recedes.

The ocean is awash in a swirl of eddies and whirlpools as the moon’s gravitational force takes hold. Then, a few hours later the entire water-borne drama is reversed as the tide comes in and Montgomery Reef disappears below sea level.

Day 6

Prince Regent River and Careening Bay

King Cascade is a classically beautiful terraced waterfall and is one of the most photographed waterfalls in the Kimberley. Falling from a considerable height and around 50m across, water tumbles down a staggered terrace of Kimberley sandstone. Layer upon layer of the ochre-hued and blackened rock sprouts grasses, mosses and ferns in a sort of lushly vegetated hanging garden.

We reach King Cascade after cruising in our Xplorer tender vessels down the Prince Regent River which is a remarkable anomaly as the river runs dead straight along a fault line.

Lt. Phillip Parker King named nearby Careening Bay after he beached his leaking vessel HMC Mermaid to effect repairs. While stranded on this remote coastline for 17 days the ship’s carpenter carved HMC Mermaid 1820 into the bottle-shaped trunk of a boab tree near the beach. 200 years later, the Mermaid Boab Tree has since split into two trunks and sports a mammoth girth of 12m. Significantly, the bulbous tree is listed on the National Register of Big Trees and the carpenter’s careful inscription now stands almost as tall as a person.

Day 7

Prince Frederick Harbour and Biggie Island

Prince Frederick Harbour is one of the Kimberley’s most spectacular locations at the southern end of York Sound. The harbour is dotted with islands lined with mangroves and monsoon rainforests, set against a backdrop of ochre-hued escarpment.

White-bellied sea eagles and other birds of prey are often seen here, and at low tide, expansive mudflats reveal large populations of mudskippers and mangrove crabs. We will take our Xplorer tender vessels on a cruise up Porosus Creek to view some striking rock formations.

Day 8

Mitchell Falls, Winyalkan & Swift Bay

Tumbling down the Mitchell Plateau in a series of tiered waterfalls and emerald green rock pools, the Mitchell Falls are the photogenic poster child for the Mitchell River National Park. Take a scenic heli flight (additional cost) to multi-tiered Mitchell Falls where emerald-hued rock pools cascade down the escarpment.

Mitchell River National Park is inhabited by significant numbers of mammals, amphibians, reptiles and bird species which are lured by a year-round water source. Sandstone terraces beside tiered rock pools make a terrific viewing platform from which to savour the serenity of this ancient landscape.

An alternative option to Mitchell Falls is exploring the sandstone caves of Hathway’s Hideaway. This mass of weathered tunnels, arches and columns form a labyrinth-like maze and was once an Aboriginal midden. Another option while anchored at Winyalkan Bay is a visit to a series Wandjina and Gwion Gwion rock art galleries at Swift Bay.

In the evening we will enjoy watching the sunset over the Indian Ocean while indulging in a gourmet BBQ.

Day 9

Vansittart Bay

Vansittart Bay is home to many cultural and historically significant sites like the remarkable Gwion Gwion (Bradshaw) Aboriginal rock art galleries estimated to be up to 20,000 years old. Jar Island is so-named after the pot shards found here, brought to the island by Macassan fisherman harvesting sea cucumbers (also known as trepang).

Nearby, on the Anjo Peninsula lays the well-preserved wreckage of a US Airforce C-53 Skytrooper aircraft, the result of a pilot losing his bearings flying from Perth to Broome in 1942 and putting down on a salt pan near present-day Truscott Airbase.

Day 10

King George River and Falls

Fed by the King George River draining across the Gardner Plateau, 80m tall King George Falls are the most impressive Kimberley waterfalls and the highest twin falls in Western Australia. Before reaching the mist-like spray rising from the base of King George Falls, we cruise through steep-sided gorges carved by a flooded river system that carved a swathe through the Kimberley landscape 400 million years ago.

Early in the waterfall season, we may cruise around the base of impressive King George Falls while in later months we take the opportunity to view the honeycomb erosion patterns of sandstone cliffs up close.

As our incredible Kimberley adventure draws to a close, on our last evening aboard we enjoy the Captain’s farewell drinks amongst new-found friends.

Day 11

Arrive in Darwin

Our incredible adventure along the Kimberley Coast concludes in Darwin this morning at 8:30am. Bid farewell to new-found friends and the Captain and crew. Post cruise transfers to CBD hotels or the airport are included.

If you’re not transferring directly to the airport why not spend the day enjoying the tropical city of Darwin with its landscaped waterfront and harbourside Wave Pool.

Overview

Ancient Lands of the Kimberley

Perfected over three decades, our 10-night Kimberley cruise takes you on an unforgettable journey from Broome to Darwin. Expert guides interpret 40,000-year-old rock art and retrace the history of Phillip Parker King who first charted this spectacular coastline 200 years ago. Later in the season, witness Humpback Whales on their migration north to breeding grounds along the Kimberley coast.

Board a Zodiac and touch the spray from the magnificent King George River and its towering 80-metre twin falls. Join an expert guide to learn about the history of the ancient Wandjina and Gwion Gwion rock paintings. Witness waterfalls cascading off Montgomery Reef as it rises out of the ocean on the ebbing tide, whilst discovering the reef’s diverse marine life.

Highlights

Experience the thrill of riding the tidal rapids through Horizontal Falls aboard a Zodiac • Marvel at King George River and get in close to the soaring 80m high King George Falls • Visit Indigenous rock art galleries and learn about ancient Wandjina and Gwion Gwion art • Spot crocodiles, tawny nurse sharks, sea turtles, humpback whales, and rock wallabies • Get up close to Montgomery Reef as it emerges from the sea and discover the tidal reef’s diverse marine life • Visit the Important Bird Area of the Lacepede Islands, and spot numerous bird species throughout your voyage, including Eastern Ospreys and White-breasted Sea Eagles • Follow in the wake of Phillip Parker King on a cruise up the Prince Regent River to King Cascade waterfall • View the Kimberley landscape from the air on an optional scenic helicopter flight to Mitchell Falls (additional cost) • Enjoy sunset canapes and drinks on the beach as dusk settles over the Kimberley

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Ship information
Coral Adventurer
Vessel Type: Expedition Ship
Length: 93.4 meters
Passenger Capacity: 120
Crew Capacity: 42
Built: 2019
Designed and built to be the most modern tropical expedition ship afloat, Coral Adventurer debuted in April 2019. She features comfortable Australian interiors, Xplorer tender mechanism, intimate guest experience, and personalized service.
Bigger is not better
At a time when cruise ships get larger and glitzier, we remain stubbornly compact and intimate. Our ships are designed to take you to unspoilt destinations not accessible to large ships.  We want you to have the luxury of space, dine with whom you please, or find your quiet corner on deck.  So we have limited the Coral Adventurer to 60 spacious Staterooms and Suites.  This preserves the intimate atmosphere we are known for without sacrificing the stability and comfort of a true ocean going vessel.
Built for discovery
The Coral Adventurer features our trademark dual ‘Xplorer’ tenders cradled on a hydraulic platform slung off the back of the ship, enabling our guests to go ashore in comfort and ease.  The shallow draft of the ship enables us to go closer to shore than larger ships. Together with our renowned expedition team, our new ship will offer the most advanced expedition capabilities of any small ship afloat.
Built for comfort
With active stabilisers dampening sea motion, mostly balcony cabins, and interiors designed with the colours and textures of tropical Queensland, the Coral Adventurer is a comfortable ship.  She features promenade decks, generous communal areas that accommodate all guests, a passenger elevator, and an open kitchen where you can observe our chefs whip up small batch cuisine from locally sourced ingredients.
Built for personal service
The Coral Adventurer will continue our proud tradition of Australian flagged vessels with friendly and professional Australian crew.  Our onboard atmosphere remains refreshingly informal and intimate.  Take your seat at our bridge lounge, chat with the captain at your leisure or accompany our chefs on a market tour.
Food and wine features
Single seating dining area with communal ‘wine table’ finished with Australian stone; serving buffet breakfast and lunch, and multi-course table d’hote dinners • Showcase galley visible to guests for fresh small-batch cuisine featuring Australian produce • Multiple indoor and outdoor bars, including our Explorer bar on the sundeck for sunset drinks with 180 degree views • Curated wine cellar featuring modestly priced boutique wines for daily drinking and exceptional vintage Australian reds.
Guest comfort
All outside-facing Staterooms and Suites with en-suite bathrooms; majority have private balcony • Active stabilisers to dampen sea motion • Gym equipped with elliptical trainers and treadmills • Passenger elevator • Wi-Fi available in all guest areas
Contact
Booking
Tall Ship Classic Sailing
Star Flyer
29.05.2021
05.06.2021
7
The Mediterranean, Southern Cyclades
Fare from € 1.965
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Travelroute
Day 1

Piraeus (Port of Athens), Greece

Walking in the shadow of the Acropolis in the Agora, you can almost hear the voices of Plato, Socrates and Aristotle arguing about who was the greatest philosopher. Ancient Athens, the birthplace of democracy and epicenter of western civilization, is a city for all eternity.

Day 2

At sea

Day 3

Rhodes, Greece

The beautiful island of Rhodes (Island of Roses) has a rich and varied history. The beach at Lindos is among the best on the island, whose capital, Rhodes Town is a bustling mecca for both sightseers and shoppers alike.

Day 4

Bodrum, Turkey

Known in ancient times as Halicarnassus, this was the birthplace of Heredotus and the site of King Mausolu's Tomb (4th century BC), one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Day 5

Dalyan River, Turkey

At first glance, this is a picture one hardly expects to see in Turkey - A lovely, unspoiled lake teeming with fish, a lush marshy delta, verdant farmlands, a lazy, reedfringed river meandering into the sea. On shore, you can see ruins of the Lycian city of Caunos, with its basilica and fortifications looming over the green marsh where endangered Caretta loggerhead turtles hatch in the spring.

Day 6

Santorini, Greece

The island of Santorini is perhaps the most breathtaking of all the Greek Islands. Around 1500 BC, a volcanic eruption destroyed the centre of the island, leaving a crescent shaped rim of cliffs around a harbour formed in the volcano's caldera.

Day 7

Hydra, Greece

Hydra is a town of stately mansions all built around 1800 by blockade runners who had made fortunes outwitting the British during the Napoleonic Wars. As there are no cars, for the spectacular view from the Monastery of Ilias you'll have to ride a donkey to the top.

Day 8

Piraeus, Greece

Disembarkation.

Additional charges: port charges: € 235,-

Overview

Southern Cyclades

Long ago, these Mediterranean islands and ports were the landing places for an endless tide of invaders from far off lands. From ancient Phoenisia, Persia, the Peloponnesus, Imperial Rome and Constantinople they came. Followed by waives of European Crusader knights, Genoan mariners, Venetian merchants and turbaned Turkish troops of the Ottoman Empire. They stormed ashore to conquer, only to be vanquished by time and absorbed into the dry volcanic earth.

All that remains are their stone ruins, ghostly shapes wrapped in myth and mystery. Today the sun-spangled seas bordered by Greece, Turkey, Italy, Croatia and the Dalmatian Coasts are inviting playgrounds for pleasure seekers. Join us as we explore a yachtsman’s paradise on forgotten islands where white-washed sands invite sun worshipers to bask under Helios’ gaze, or fortress-like rocks where ancient monasteries cling like mountain climbers on towering cliffs.

Or stand where battling armies fought hand-to-hand in Troy and Gallipoli. Walk through iron doors of medieval Kastros where tales of pagan rites and knightly rituals are told. Inhale the balm of almond and lemon at the place where Hippocrates taught his healing arts. The Dodecanese, the Cyclades, the Sporades, the Dardanelles Islands and places that fairly sing on the tongue. And no one knows these favoured lands and seas as well as Star Clippers.

Highlights

The Grand Master’s Palace, Rhodes • Village of Oia in Satorini • Bodrum’s Museum of Underwater Archaeology

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Ship information

Star Flyer

Vessel Type: Tall Ship

Length: 109.7 meters

Passenger Capacity: 170

Crew Capacity: 74

Star Flyer is a true clipper ship reflecting it's proud heritage in every inch of her polished brass and gleaming brightwork. Step aboard this unique vessel and discover a new age of sail, where the traditions of the past are happily married to the comforts and amenities of the present day. Star Flyer is a modern cruise ship in every way, created for luxury-loving passengers who also love the traditions and romance of the legendary era of sailing ships. Star Flyer is 360 feet long and carries just 170 guests in pampered comfort.

Life aboard is blissfully relaxed, much like traveling on a private yacht. You’ll never feel confined on Star Flyer. Ship offers spacious accommodations and expansive teak decks with ample space and not one, but two swimming pools. In fact, you’ll find that this ship offers more outdoor space per passenger than most conventional cruise ships.

The décor of Star Flyer is reminiscent of the grand age of sail. Antique prints and paintings of famous sailing ships please the eye, while teak and gleaming mahogany rails are richly reminiscent of Star Clippers’ proud nautical heritage.

All Star Clippers ships feature open-seating dining in an elegantly appointed dining room, our convivial indoor-outdoor Tropical Bar and Piano Bar, and an Edwardian style library where a Belle Époque fireplace glows with a warmth that reflects the friendliness and enthusiasm of Star Clippers’ hospitable officers and crew.

Contact
Booking
Luxury Expedition
Caledonian Sky
01.06.2021
13.06.2021
12
Northern Europe, Passage to Iceland
Fare from € 8.150
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Travelroute
Day 1

Oban, Scotland

Embark the MS Caledonian Sky this afternoon. Transfers will be provided from Glasgow Airport and Glasgow Central Station at a fixed time. Sail early this evening.

Day 2

St Kilda & Stac Lee

Awake this morning in St Kilda, a remarkable uninhabited archipelago some fifty miles beyond the Outer Hebrides. Dominated by the highest cliffs and sea stacks in Britain, Hirta, St Kilda’s main island was occupied on and off for at least two thousand years, with the last 36 Gaelic speaking inhabitants evacuated at their own request in 1930. Immediately after the evacuation, the island was bought by the Marquess of Bute to protect the island’s thousands of seabirds including puffin and fulmars, and in 1957 it was bequeathed to The National Trust for Scotland. St Kilda is one of only two dozen UNESCO World Heritage Sites with dual status reflecting its natural and cultural significance. The local ranger will join us on board before our expedition staff lead a number of guided walks on the island. Later, cruise past one of the largest gannetries in the world, Stac Lee.

Day 3

Suduroy, Faroe Islands

Over lunch we will arrive at Suduroy, the southernmost island of the Faroe Islands. From the port of Tvoroyri we will have a choice of activities. Choose to join an island drive passing the beautiful scenery as we drive between the villages seeing the stunning geology, fjords, tunnels and architecture of the island and end at the southernmost point and the Akraberg lighthouse. In Porkeri we will take the ridge-top road which winds up the mountainside for wonderful views towards the steep cliffs on the west coast, the Beinisvoro promontory to the north and the luscious grass slopes to the east. To locals, this delivers the essence of the Faroe Islands with mountains and fjords, villages and valleys, birds, sheep and nature. Alternatively, those feeling active may wish to join a hike to Hvaanhagi, a beautiful, uninhibited place north of Tvoroyri on the east coast of Suduroy. The view is fantastic towards the three islands Litla Dímun, Stora Dimun and Skuvoy.

Day 4

Torshavn

From our berth this morning we will join a guided tour through Torshavn over the hills to Kirkjubour, the island’s oldest cultural centre, where we see the ruins of the 13th century St Magnus Cathedral and the 11th century church, still in use. We also visit the 900-year old ‘Roykstovan’, the old bishopric, considered to be the oldest wooden house in Europe. For those feeling active we will arrange a hike in the hills surrounding the town to discover the local flora and fauna. After lunch on board, we will drive to the beautiful village of Saksun, an isolated settlement situated beneath steep majestic mountains. We visit Duvugaroar, an old farmhouse, which is now a museum and visit a traditional Faeroese wooden church in Kollafjord.

Day 5

Vestmanna

Vestmanna is our base this morning as we explore the northwest corner of Streymoy and the nearby cliffs. We will board local boats to explore the vertical cliffs that climb almost 1500 feet, sailing into grottos carved by the surf over the years and watching the thousands of seabirds including puffins, guillemots, fulmars and kittiwakes that nest here each summer. Return to the ship for lunch and spend a relaxing afternoon on board sailing towards Iceland.

Day 6

Hofn, Iceland

Today we will see the shimmering white Vatnajokull Glacier, Europe’s largest glacier, sometimes called an icecap. The 600 metre thick ice surmounts active volcanoes, one of which erupted in 1996, creating a crater on the surface of the glacier, a most unusual phenomenon. We will drive to the otherworldly glacial lagoon of Jokulsarlon, a dramatic drive through some of the finest scenery that Iceland offers. Once we reach Jokulsarlon, the 100 metre deep glacial river lagoon which is full of large icebergs, carved from the glacier Breioamerkurjokull, we will embark on a cruise on the pristine water, sailing in between the blue, white and black ice.

Day 7

Neskaupstadur & Mjoifjordur

Enjoy the benefits of our small ship as we explore the lesser known fjords in the south east of Iceland. This morning we hope to land at the small town at Neskaupstadur for a chance to visit the excellent museum which features the local art gallery, Museum of Natural History and Maritime Museum. The more active can hike to the avalanche barriers behind the town, offering great views of the surrounding areas. This afternoon we cruise through Mjoifjordur where we can enjoy the wilderness of this remote area.

Day 8

Husavik

Over breakfast we arrive in Husavik, known as the whale capital of Iceland. There will be a choice of excursions to choose from. Using local boats explore Skjalfandi Bay looking for one of the 15 species of whales, the most popular being humpback, minke and blue whales, as well as white beaked dolphins and many different kinds of birds. After lunch on board we have the afternoon to explore the pretty town including time at the excellent whale museum, the exploration museum and quaint local church. Alternatively, visit the Lake Myvatn-Krafla area, a fine example of the volcanic world with lava fields, boiling and steaming mud pools and steam vents of sulphur and craters. The area illustrates the sheer magnitude of Iceland’s forces at work. The lake itself, with beautiful natural rock formations and hot springs, is also a unique ecosystem and the largest migratory bird sanctuary in Europe. We will offer time in the natural baths before returning to the ship.

Day 9

Grimsey Island & Siglufjordur

Spend the morning on Grimsey Island. The Arctic Circle bisects this island which is known for its tiny community, basalt cliffs and large variety of birdlife. On arrival join our expedition team members for a nature walk on the island. Over lunch we sail to Siglufjordur, a picturesque town that enjoys an idyllic setting in a small fjord backed by mountains. Here in the early 1900s, a booming economy due to the herring industry resulted in a prosperous town with some marvellous Icelandic architecture. Stroll through the town and visit the Herring Era Museum. Be on deck early this evening as we sail down Eyafjordur, on the lookout for whales, during our approach to Akureyri.

Day 10

Akureyri & Hrisey Island

Akureyri is a delightful town on the north coast of Iceland and not what you would expect to find in such a remote location. In summer months the gardens and window boxes are ablaze with colour. On a morning tour we visit the spectacular Godafoss Waterfall where water from the Skjalfandafljot river falls from a height of 12 metres over a width of 30 metres. From Godafoss we return to the charming town of Akureyri and visit the botanical garden which was founded in 1912 and grows examples of every species indigenous to Iceland as well as an extensive collection of high-latitude and high-altitude plants from around the world. Our tour ends at the Art Alley, where artisans keep their workshops and galleries. Return to the ship for lunch and sail to Hrisey Island this afternoon where you can join nature walks. The island is known for its rich and diverse bird life and approximately 40 species of bird’s nest on the island.

Day 11

Hornbjarg & Vigur Island

In the early morning we will sail by the Hornbjarg Cliffs. These stunning cliffs rise 534 metres from the sea and are one of the largest centres for puffins in Iceland. We continue to the Western Fjords, an isolated but spectacular area of Iceland. Arriving in the early afternoon we will explore Isafjardardjup with the MS Caledonian Sky and depending on local weather conditions, we hope to land on Vigur, a serene little island with only five residents but home to many more puffins, eider ducks, black guillemots and Arctic terns. We will also visit Iceland’s only extant windmill dating from the 19th century.

Day 12

Latrabjarg & Stykkisholmur

During breakfast we will cruise past the Latrabjarg cliffs, the westernmost point of Europe. Later on, we sail to Stykkisholmur located in Breidafjordur Bay and surrounded by an archipelago of islands. The town is famed for its beautiful and well preserved old houses and is also the gateway to the Snaefellsnes Peninsula which is dominated by the Snæfellsjokull volcano, regarded as one of the symbols of Iceland and known as the setting for Jules Verne’s “Journey to the Centre of the Earth”. Enjoy an afternoon tour which will include a drive through the lava landscape to the glacier visiting pretty fishing ports and beaches along the way or spend the afternoon at leisure in the town.

Day 13

Reykjavik to London

Disembark after breakfast and transfer to the airport for your scheduled flight to London.

SHIP TO SHORE
This voyage is a combination of both expedition style cruising and small ship destination cruising. Whilst we will be alongside most days, we will be at anchor and the vessel’s Zodiacs will be utilised to transport passengers ashore when visiting St Kilda, Grimsey, Hrisey Island and Vigur Island. The use of the Zodiacs will be key to the operation of the planned itinerary.

Overview

Passage to Iceland

Join us aboard the MS Caledonian Sky for an expedition which combines an indepth exploration of the remote and little visited Faroe Islands with time spent exploring Iceland, one of the most extraordinary and dramatic lands on the planet. A journey by small ship is the ideal way to get up close to nature and explore areas inaccessible to larger vessels and an expedition such as this can only be undertaken by a special vessel with the self-sufficient qualities of the MS Caledonian Sky. With her expert team and fleet of Zodiacs we will be able to land on remote beaches and cruise close to shorelines and cliffs crowded with birdlife. With just over 100 travelling companions, the atmosphere on board is warm and friendly and ashore with our local experts we will divide into small groups thereby enjoying a more comprehensive and peaceful experience.
We will set sail from Oban, enjoying the opportunity to visit St Kilda before sailing north to the Faroe Islands. Once a stopping point for Viking explorers, this mysterious collection of 18 islands set in the North Atlantic, halfway between Norway and Iceland, is a paradise for walkers and bird watchers. The intriguing history of the islands can be traced back to the Irish monks who settled here in the 6th century and the 9th century seafaring explorers who traversed the North Sea. Here, a highlight will be seeing the many puffins and other sea birds nesting and we will spend three days exploring the villages and rolling hills of these distant isles before venturing further north to Iceland.
Iceland is without doubt one of the most extraordinary and dramatic lands on the planet and whilst exploring the island we will witness the immense scale of the landscape dominated by towering snow-capped mountains, thundering waterfalls and spontaneous erupting geysers as we learn of the centuries old legacies of a Viking and Norse heritage. Europe’s least populated country offers the visitor a truly unparalleled experience of elemental forces at work. We will visit some of its most dramatic areas and, whilst we sail its waters, will look out for humpback whales, orcas, white-beaked dolphins and observe the colonies of seabirds.

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Ship information

Caledonian Sky

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition
Length: 90 meters
Passenger Capacity: 114
Crew Capacity: 70
Built: 1991 / refurbished 2018
The MS Caledonian Sky accommodates a maximum of 114 passengers in 57 spacious outside suites. Many have walk-in wardrobes and some feature tub baths. There will be seven categories of suites and sixteen suites will have private balconies. For those familiar with the MS Island Sky she will feel like a second home, although there are some differences. The dining room, lounge, Lido Deck and bar are all similar. However, the ‘Club’ on the MS Caledonian Sky has been transported to the very top deck. Here, there is a library and bar which leads out on to a lovely forward deck. The ‘Club’ has wonderful views with ceiling to floor windows.
If you like the MS Island Sky, we are sure you will also approve of her sister. And, of course it is important that we offer the very best of facilities. However, equally as important are the staff on board whether they are the vessel’s crew or our own expedition staff. Noble Caledonia’s reputation has been built on providing the very best in all areas. Their crew of 70 not only offer an excellent service they are also noted for their kindness and attention to detail. A well run ship with a warm atmosphere is what we are known for, and it is because most of our crew have been with us for many years that we are able to engender such an atmosphere.
Your Suite
On board there are 57 exceptionally spacious and well-designed suites, 23 of which have private balconies located on the Promenade or Bridge Decks. Following a comprehensive refurbishment of the suites in November 2018, the suites on each deck have their own colour theme utilising fabrics from companies such as Osbourne & Little and Zimmer & Rohde. Soft hues, blended tones and the classic contemporary fabrics enhance the traditional maritime style making the passenger accommodation an inviting and relaxing place to be. Each suite exudes great character and grandeur with wood panelling and brass features found throughout. The large suites are arranged over four decks and all have outside facing views. All suites feature a sitting area complete with coffee table, armchairs and flat screen televisions (DVD players and DVDs can be borrowed from reception for use in your suite).

Your space

The spacious and finely decorated public rooms on board the MS Caledonian Sky include a large lounge featuring comfortable seating. Daily briefings given by the onboard team and talks from Guest Speakers take place in the Main Lounge which is fitted with multiple screens. For your convenience it is also possible to follow the onboard lectures from the comfort of your suite. Also in the Lounge is a 24-hour tea and coffee station along with an elegant bar where the onboard pianist plays periodically throughout the day. In addition to the Main Lounge on the Caledonian Deck, there is the recently refurbished Lounge on the Panorama Deck which has a bar, library and further spacious seating arrangements, ideal for watching the world go by as you cruise to your next destination. The Travel Library is the perfect place to relax with a good book and is well stocked with reference books pertaining to the destinations the vessel is visiting and a collection of essential reads. A selection of games and devices to access the internet via the ship’s satellite can also be found in the library. Access to the ship’s satellite Wi-Fi via your own device is complimentary on board (signal strength varies depending on location and demand). The Dining Room which can seat all guests at one sitting is located on the Castle Deck. Outside there is a rear Lido Deck which is complete with deck tables and chairs where meals are served in warm weather under shade and often occasions such as sail away parties and barbeques are held here.
On the Panorama Deck towards the front of the vessel there is an additional Observation Deck, complete with bar and comfortable cushioned deck furniture for sun bathing, relaxing with a book or catching up with fellow travellers. On the Promenade Deck there is also a small gymnasium featuring a treadmill, bicycle and cross trainer, and a hairdressers with appointments made on request. For your wellbeing, there is a clinic with Doctor on board and a lift which serves all decks.

Your dining
With only one sitting and a maximum of just over 100 passengers, the quality of cuisine will be of a consistent superior quality. Where possible and when it meets his high standards, our accomplished chef will obtain local produce in markets or buy the catch of the day from a passing fishing boat. Such purchases enhance the well stocked larders and bring a local touch to the varied menus. In the main elegant dining room, breakfast is served buffet-style, with certain items cooked to order and lunch and dinner is à la carte. When weather permits, breakfast, a buffet-style lunch and dinner are also served on deck. To enhance your dining experience even further a selection of wines are included with lunch and dinner. Afternoon tea is served in the lounge and tea and coffee are available 24 hours. With sufficient notice, most diets can be catered for on board.

For your comfort
MS Caledonian Sky is equipped with the latest safety, navigation and communications equipment along with roll stabilizers to minimize the ship’s motion. As is the joy of small ship cruising, during your voyage, we hope to offer the opportunity to visit the Captain and Officers on the Bridge to check the vessels progress by charts and learn more about your journey (subject to weather or security conditions). There is a navigation channel on the television in your suite showing the routing of the vessel. On board you will also find a clinic and doctor and a lift that serves all decks. Smoking on board is restricted to a specific area on deck.
Gratuities
Unlike many other cruise vessels, onboard the MS Caledonian Sky you do not need to worry about tipping staff as we have included them in your holiday price. In addition we tip all their guides and drivers along the way, thereby taking away the hassle of always having to remember to have some small change with you.
Contact
Booking
Luxury Small Ship Cruise
Silver Origin
05.06.2021
12.06.2021
7
Latin America, Galápagos Islands Luxury Cruise
Fare from € 9,000
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Travelroute
Day 1

San Cristobal and Kicker Rock

Like so many of the islands in the Galápagos, San Cristobal is formed by dormant volcanoes. It lies to the east of the archipelago and is one of the oldest islands in the group. Approximately 6,000 people live on the island, making their living from tourism, fishing, in government offices, or off the rich volcanic soils with some limited farming existing in the highlands. Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on the southwestern tip of the island is the capital city of the Galápagos Islands. A statue of Charles Darwin graces the harbor, marking one of the first places he likely stepped ashore in the 1830s.
Kicker Rock is the vertical remnant of a former tuff cone less than 5 kilometers to the west of San Cristobal. Both its Spanish name “Leon Dormido” (Sleeping Lion) and English name Kicker Rock imply that it is one rock only -when in fact it is a larger one 300 meters long by 100 meters wide with a maximum height of approximately 150 meters and next to it an obelisk-like rock separated by a narrow channel some 20 meters deep. When approaching Kicker Rock, Blue-footed Boobies, Nazca Boobies and frigatebirds can be observed in the air, while sea lions can be seen along the shore. Snorkelers and divers have reported manta rays, hammerhead sharks and turtles. The Spanish name implies that the geological formation seen from the south resembles a sleeping lion. An interesting explanation for the English name suggests that James Colnett in 1794 likened it to famous landmarks in Portsmouth.

Day 2

Isla Bartolome and Buccaneer Cove, Santiago

Our ship anchors in sight of the volcanic moonscape of Isla Bartolomé, at Sullivan Bay. Zodiacs bring guests ashore to ascend a boardwalk of 388 steps. Passing through the arid volcanic landscape provides a chance to watch for lava lizards, Galapagos Hawks, and Blue-footed Boobies. However, the climber’s ultimate reward is one of the most beautiful panoramas in all of the Galapagos Islands – the view towards Pinnacle Rock with black, volcanic cones of Baltra, Daphne Major and Daphne Minor in the distance. On the way down watch how the sunlight catches the green of pioneering plant species in stark contrast against dark volcanic rock, and look forward to time swimming and snorkeling from the golden beach at Bahia Dorada.

Day 3

Punta Vicente Roca (Isabela) and Punta Espinoza (Fernandina)

Punta Vicente Roca is one of the marine sites Isabela Island has to offer. On the southern side of Ecuador Volcano, the tip of land on the western end of Isabela is named after Vicente Ramon Roca, President of Ecuador from 1845-49, who as Prefect of Guayas had proposed the Ecuadorian annexation of the Galapagos Islands in 1831. The geological formations, the underwater caves and lava tubes offer fascinating views of the coastline. The South Equatorial Countercurrent hits this part of the archipelago from the west and the water offers abundant food sources for different marine life and seabirds. It is normal to see Pacific green turtles, but sharks, rays, whales and dolphins can also be expected, apart from a small colony of fur seals. Blue-footed Boobies, Nazca Boobies, Brown Noddies and other seabirds nest in the cliffs and both the endemic Galapagos Penguins and Flightless Cormorants have established small colonies nearby. Marine iguanas also like this area because of the rich variety of seaweeds growing underwater along the western coast of Isabela. As a marine site, deepwater snorkeling is also possible at Punta Vicente Roca.
With the gentle slopes of La Cumbre volcano in the distance, the low, lava-forged coast of Punta Espinoza on Fernandina Island is a spectacular sight. Hundreds of marine iguanas rest on the black rock of recent lava flows absorbing heat from the stone and defending their territories against one another. Galapagos sea lions and their pups also take shelter here, resting on the beach and playing in the shallow tide pools sprinkled along the coast. Walk past high sandy areas where marine iguanas lay their eggs and along low, shallow mangrove ponds ringed with bright red Sally Lightfoot crabs and Flightless Cormorants drying their stubby wings in the sunshine.

Day 4

Tagus Cove and Elizabeth Bay

Tagus Cove is bordered by a steep rocky coastline and has for centuries offered shelter for ships and yachts. The cove is named after the British frigate HMS Tagus visiting the Galapagos in 1814. Already by the 1830s other ships had their visits recorded by painting or scratching their name onto the rocks. On approach Galapagos Penguins and Flightless Cormorants –both birds mainly found on Isabela’s west coast and neighboring Fernandina- are often seen. From the landing a trail through an incense tree forest leads past Darwin Lake to a viewpoint on top of a splatter cone. During the hike several land birds including Medium Ground-Finches, Galapagos Hawks, Yellow Warblers as well as Large-billed and Vermilion Flycatchers are often present. Brown Noddies and Blue-footed Boobies prefer the rocks along the shore.
Elizabeth Bay is one of the marine sites on Isabela’s west coast. South of Alcedo Volcano and north of Sierra Negra, Elizabeth Bay is found at Isabela’s narrowest east-west extension where the lava flows of these two volcanoes have connected each other. Elizabeth Bay’s shores show mangroves and specifically the easternmost part, a cove which can only be entered via a narrow channel, has red, white and black mangroves. Different animals prefer different parts of Elizabeth Bay. Las Marielas, three rocks at the entrance to the bay, are favored by Blue-footed Boobies, Flightless Cormorants and Galapagos Penguins as a resting place, while the mangrove area is preferred by Great Blue Herons for hunting or the Magnificent Frigatebirds for perching. The bay is used by turtles, rays and even sharks for feeding or resting. The shallow water and the root system of the mangroves in the small inlet allow smaller fish to hide from bigger predators.

Day 5

Post Office Bay (Floreana), Champion Islet, Floreana and Punta Cormorant (Floreana)

Floreana’s Post Office Bay has received its name as the site was used to leave mail for retrieval by others who were thought to stop at the Galapagos Islands or might be heading for the addressee’s direction. First mentioned by Porter in 1813 as “Hathaway’s Postoffice”, HMS Beagle’s captain FitzRoy stated that it was not in use in 1835 as the island was already settled at that time. Floreana had been the first island to be settled by Ecuadorians in 1832. Today a barrel instead of the original box is used by visitors who leave their own postcards and retrieve mail for hand-delivery. Apart from the beach and mail barrel the bay offers good swimming and snorkeling. The area holds remains of a failed Norwegian fish canning plant and settlement dating back to the 1920s. A lava tube in the vicinity can also be explored. Although Floreana is inhabited, the number of residents is reduced because of the difficult access to water. A track from Post Office Bay connects with the only road from Puerto Velazco Ibarra on the west coast to a spring in the highlands.
Champion Islet is a small islet some 700 meters off the northeast coast of Floreana. It is one of four marine sites surrounding Floreana and offers excellent deepwater snorkeling opportunities. Curious sea lions approach the snorkelers while turtles slowly swim by and sharks, sting rays, and a high diversity of colorful fishes can usually be seen. During a Zodiac cruise around Champion Islet not only seabirds such as Nazca Boobies, Swallow-tailed Gulls, or Red-billed Tropicbirds will be seen, it is also possible to spot the rare Floreana Mockingbird.
Floreana Island’s northernmost point is called Punta Cormorant – named after the British naval vessel HMS Cormorant and dating back to the late 19th century. From the landing beach a short track leads to a shallow lagoon that is famous for its flamingos. The brilliantly pink birds skim the salty waters for shrimp and tend to chicks on the nest. The trail then scales a low hillside through scattered Palo Santo trees to reveal an idyllic white-sand beach on the other side of the point. Standing at the edge of the lapping waves, you might spot mammoth female sea turtles hauling themselves out of the sea to lay eggs in the sugar sand dunes that lay high above the tide line. Before returning to the landing site your guides may also point out White-cheeked Pintails, Blue-footed Boobies, Yellow Warblers, and Medium and Small Ground Finches.

Day 6

Santa Cruz Highlands and Fausto Llerena Breeding Center, Puerto Ayora

Los Gemelos (The Twins) is a visitor site in the Santa Cruz highlands. Found some 15 kilometers northwest of Puerto Ayora, the road leading from Puerto Ayora in the south of Santa Cruz to Itabaca in the north dissects the twin pit craters. Pit craters are formed when the roof of an underground void collapses. The smaller pit crater is on the eastern side of the road, while the larger one is on the western side. See from above, the two openings in the ground are not at all identical. Their layout might imply an elongated magma chamber or a lava tube leading further west and the larger twin actually having formerly been two small pit craters whose connecting wall collapsed as well. Trails through a Scalesia forest not only give access to good views of the pit craters, but also permit to observe some of the smaller land birds. Vermilion Flycatchers, Yellow Warblers, Galapagos Doves, Medium Ground Finches and several other finch species can often be seen there.
Silver Origin will anchor in front of Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz, where the prestigious Charles Darwin Research Station is located. The station also houses the Fausto Llerena Breeding Center for giant tortoises and land iguanas where guides interpret the centre’s captive breeding and reintroduction programs. In addition to these star species, throughout the station there are huge prickly pear cactus trees being fed upon by the pretty Galapagos Cactus Finch. To round out the stay in Puerto Ayora, enjoy free time in town where local artists have created charming art galleries and corner cafés.

Day 7

Cerro Dragon (Santa Cruz), Isla Guy Fawkes and Bahía Borrero, Santa Cruz

Cerro Dragón’s land iguanas once played an important part in a conservation program headed by the Charles Darwin Foundation and the Galapagos National Park. When the reptiles’ numbers declined in the 1970s, some animals were taken to breed in captivity and were released back into undeveloped areas. Today, it is an honor to see the success of this program firsthand at Cerro Dragón. Walk inland on a trail past small saltwater lagoons that periodically feature flamingos, to see the reintroduced animals. In a periodic local phenomenon, during rainier times the salinity in the lagoons drops with the inflow of freshwater. As a consequence crustacean populations decline, which in turn means the shorebirds become scarce.
In the northern area of Santa Cruz Island, Bahía Borrero is a beautiful white coralline beach used as a nesting site by Green Sea turtles. Behind the dunes, we have a forest of typical vegetation from the arid zone: Palo Santo, Leather leaf, and Salty bushes. This vegetation welcomes Yellow Warblers, and some of the most characteristic species of Darwin Finches, such as the Common Cactus Finch or the Small Ground Finch. This extinct volcano, due to its altitude, shows all the different zones of vegetation, changing from the littoral to the arid, and then with more moisture into the humid zone, to end in the dry pampa zone. It is an impressive landscape to enjoy while you swim in the turquoise waters of the bay or have a nice relaxing walk along the beach.

Day 8

Baltra

Disembarkation.
Baltra Island, also known as South Seymour, is truly the entrance to the Galapagos Islands. Despite not being considered as part of the National Park proper, Baltra definitely offers a taste of the weird and wonderful nature that thrives on the islands. The island is located in the central part of the archipelago. At just eight sq. mi it is one of smallest islands, yet its flat, volcanic rock surface and central location in the archipelago makes it an ideal place for one of the islands’ two airports. The airport was built by the US Air Force, who used it as an army base during WWII. As a travel destination in itself it offers few attractions, and all travellers who come here are just passing through, either on either way to or from the islands. There is no tourism infrastructure (save a few agencies that offer tours of the islands) or shops on Baltra and any purchases that you might wish to make should be done at the airport if they can. However, land iguanas and Galapagos finches are popular sights, and the iguanas are often seen running across the runway itself. As you cross the Itabaca Channel to or from Santa Cruz, be on the lookout for some other Galapagian locals: giant turtles and playful sea lions completely oblivious to the humans around.

Ship information

Galápagos Islands Luxury Cruise

Including return flights between Ecuador and Galápagos.

The weird and wonderful Galápagos Islands are definitely contenders for the world best travel destination. These are the islands where the animals look at humans curiously, rather than the other way around! Inspiring and educational, each island has its own species and strengths, ranging from miles of dramatic coastline to nesting colonies of endemic birds. The islands may be small, but be prepared for some big surprises! Ticking off all 15 species of the Galapagos Big 15, this seven day voyage is perfect for curious cruisers! From marine iguanas to Galapagos Hawks, to the iconic blue-footed boobie, no other place on Earth can compare to the Galapagos’ fusion of flora and fauna. Join us to explore the volcanic landscapes that time forgot, discover unique wildlife both above and below the sea, drinking in the drama and depth of natural history along the way.
Highlights

Guided Zodiac, land and sea tours, and shoreside activities led by the Expeditions Team • Enrichment lectures by a highly qualified Expeditions Team • Isla Bartolomé & Santiago Island • Fernandina Island, Isabela Island and more • Amazing Wildlife & Snorkelling

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Ship information

Silver Origin

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition
Length: 101 metres
Passenger Capacity: 100
Crew: 90
Built: 2020

The first destination specific ship built by Silversea, Silver Origin is the height of experiential travel in the Galápagos. Never before have the islands been so superbly presented: a team of Ecuadorian national expert guides, the highest crew-to-guest ratio in the Galápagos, 8 Zodiacs, seamless hybrid spaces that offer an extraordinary voyage – for extraordinary people. All-suite accommodation, Horizon Balconies, butler service, sophisticated interiors, interactive basecamp, Ecuadorian inspired cuisine … no aspect of Silver Origin has been left to chance. The most environmentally conscious ship we have ever built, take a vertical leap and transform your idea of travel with Silver Origin.

Contact
Booking
Small Expedition Yacht
Coral Adventurer
14.06.2021
24.06.2021
10
Australia and NZ, Ancient Lands of the Kimberley
Fare from € 6.850
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Travelroute
Day 1

Depart Broome

Board your Coral Expeditions ship at 4.00pm where there is time to settle into your stateroom before our 5:00pm departure. Take the time to become acquainted with all the facilities onboard as we cruise northwards towards Cape Leveque.

As dusk falls meet your fellow travellers, the Captain and crew for the Captain’s Welcome Drinks.

Day 2

Lacepede Islands

The Lacepede Islands are a protected class-A nature reserve and are significant as a seabird nesting rookery for brown boobies and roseate terns. Other species often sighted at the Lacepedes include Australian Pelicans, frigate birds, egrets and gulls. The four low-lying islands are also an important breeding and nesting habitat for green turtles.

If weather and tide conditions are suitable, we will explore the lagoons by Xplorer and Zodiac tender vessels.

Day 3

Horizontal Falls and Buccaneer Archipelago

he Horizontal Falls are one of the Kimberley’s biggest attractions and are a result of the mammoth 11m tides the Kimberley is renowned for. Naturalist David Attenborough described the Horizontal Falls as ‘one of the greatest natural wonders of the world.’

The Horizontal Falls are created as the ocean thunders through a narrow gorge in the McLarty Ranges. Water builds up on one side and is forcibly pushed through the bottleneck, creating a rushing horizontal waterfall of swiftly flowing seawater. Riding the rapids on our Zodiac inflatable tenders is one of the highlights of our Kimberley expedition cruises.

Talbot Bay is at the heart of the Buccaneer Archipelago, where rocks on the 800 or so islands are estimated at over 2 billion years old. At Cyclone Creek, you will see evidence of massive geological forces in the impressive rock formations and cruise through the Iron Islands, past Koolan Island, before enjoying sunset drinks at Nares Point.

Day 4

Doubtful Bay and Raft Point

Raft Point guards the entrance to Doubtful Bay, a vast body of sheltered water which harbours significant sites such as the ancient Wandjina rock art galleries, considered some of the finest in the Kimberley. If a Traditional Owner guide is available to accompany us, we will be able to visit the galleries.

Doubtful Bay is the traditional country of the Worrora people who follow the Wandjina, their god, law-maker and creator. Images of Wandjina are found throughout the Kimberley, recording their stories, knowledge and culture in stone.

Other sites we aim to visit in Doubtful Bay include the mighty Sale River, Steep Island and Ruby Falls at Red Cone Creek.

Day 5

Montgomery Reef

Montgomery Reef is a biologically diverse area covering over 400sq km and was named by Phillip Parker King. Twice daily, as the sea recedes in mammoth 11m tides, Montgomery Reef rises from the Indian Ocean in a cascade of rushing water revealing a flat-topped reef pockmarked with rockpools and rivulets.

As the reef emerges, we get up close in our Xplorer and Zodiac inflatable tenders to witness the spectacle as our Expedition Team share their knowledge on the formation of the reef and the myriad wildlife. Opportunistic birds take advantage of the emerging reef, feeding on marine life left exposed in rock pools. Turtles and dolphins too are also attracted to feeding opportunities as the ocean recedes.

The ocean is awash in a swirl of eddies and whirlpools as the moon’s gravitational force takes hold. Then, a few hours later the entire water-borne drama is reversed as the tide comes in and Montgomery Reef disappears below sea level.

Day 6

Prince Regent River and Careening Bay

King Cascade is a classically beautiful terraced waterfall and is one of the most photographed waterfalls in the Kimberley. Falling from a considerable height and around 50m across, water tumbles down a staggered terrace of Kimberley sandstone. Layer upon layer of the ochre-hued and blackened rock sprouts grasses, mosses and ferns in a sort of lushly vegetated hanging garden.

We reach King Cascade after cruising in our Xplorer tender vessels down the Prince Regent River which is a remarkable anomaly as the river runs dead straight along a fault line.

Lt. Phillip Parker King named nearby Careening Bay after he beached his leaking vessel HMC Mermaid to effect repairs. While stranded on this remote coastline for 17 days the ship’s carpenter carved HMC Mermaid 1820 into the bottle-shaped trunk of a boab tree near the beach. 200 years later, the Mermaid Boab Tree has since split into two trunks and sports a mammoth girth of 12m. Significantly, the bulbous tree is listed on the National Register of Big Trees and the carpenter’s careful inscription now stands almost as tall as a person.

Day 7

Prince Frederick Harbour and Biggie Island

Prince Frederick Harbour is one of the Kimberley’s most spectacular locations at the southern end of York Sound. The harbour is dotted with islands lined with mangroves and monsoon rainforests, set against a backdrop of ochre-hued escarpment.

White-bellied sea eagles and other birds of prey are often seen here, and at low tide, expansive mudflats reveal large populations of mudskippers and mangrove crabs. We will take our Xplorer tender vessels on a cruise up Porosus Creek to view some striking rock formations.

Day 8

Mitchell Falls, Winyalkan & Swift Bay

Tumbling down the Mitchell Plateau in a series of tiered waterfalls and emerald green rock pools, the Mitchell Falls are the photogenic poster child for the Mitchell River National Park. Take a scenic heli flight (additional cost) to multi-tiered Mitchell Falls where emerald-hued rock pools cascade down the escarpment.

Mitchell River National Park is inhabited by significant numbers of mammals, amphibians, reptiles and bird species which are lured by a year-round water source. Sandstone terraces beside tiered rock pools make a terrific viewing platform from which to savour the serenity of this ancient landscape.

An alternative option to Mitchell Falls is exploring the sandstone caves of Hathway’s Hideaway. This mass of weathered tunnels, arches and columns form a labyrinth-like maze and was once an Aboriginal midden. Another option while anchored at Winyalkan Bay is a visit to a series Wandjina and Gwion Gwion rock art galleries at Swift Bay.

In the evening we will enjoy watching the sunset over the Indian Ocean while indulging in a gourmet BBQ.

Day 9

Vansittart Bay

Vansittart Bay is home to many cultural and historically significant sites like the remarkable Gwion Gwion (Bradshaw) Aboriginal rock art galleries estimated to be up to 20,000 years old. Jar Island is so-named after the pot shards found here, brought to the island by Macassan fisherman harvesting sea cucumbers (also known as trepang).

Nearby, on the Anjo Peninsula lays the well-preserved wreckage of a US Airforce C-53 Skytrooper aircraft, the result of a pilot losing his bearings flying from Perth to Broome in 1942 and putting down on a salt pan near present-day Truscott Airbase.

Day 10

King George River and Falls

Fed by the King George River draining across the Gardner Plateau, 80m tall King George Falls are the most impressive Kimberley waterfalls and the highest twin falls in Western Australia. Before reaching the mist-like spray rising from the base of King George Falls, we cruise through steep-sided gorges carved by a flooded river system that carved a swathe through the Kimberley landscape 400 million years ago.

Early in the waterfall season, we may cruise around the base of impressive King George Falls while in later months we take the opportunity to view the honeycomb erosion patterns of sandstone cliffs up close.

As our incredible Kimberley adventure draws to a close, on our last evening aboard we enjoy the Captain’s farewell drinks amongst new-found friends.

Day 11

Arrive in Darwin

Our incredible adventure along the Kimberley Coast concludes in Darwin this morning at 8:30am. Bid farewell to new-found friends and the Captain and crew. Post cruise transfers to CBD hotels or the airport are included.

If you’re not transferring directly to the airport why not spend the day enjoying the tropical city of Darwin with its landscaped waterfront and harbourside Wave Pool.

Overview

Ancient Lands of the Kimberley

Perfected over three decades, our 10-night Kimberley cruise takes you on an unforgettable journey from Broome to Darwin. Expert guides interpret 40,000-year-old rock art and retrace the history of Phillip Parker King who first charted this spectacular coastline 200 years ago. Later in the season, witness Humpback Whales on their migration north to breeding grounds along the Kimberley coast.

Board a Zodiac and touch the spray from the magnificent King George River and its towering 80-metre twin falls. Join an expert guide to learn about the history of the ancient Wandjina and Gwion Gwion rock paintings. Witness waterfalls cascading off Montgomery Reef as it rises out of the ocean on the ebbing tide, whilst discovering the reef’s diverse marine life.

Highlights

Experience the thrill of riding the tidal rapids through Horizontal Falls aboard a Zodiac • Marvel at King George River and get in close to the soaring 80m high King George Falls • Visit Indigenous rock art galleries and learn about ancient Wandjina and Gwion Gwion art • Spot crocodiles, tawny nurse sharks, sea turtles, humpback whales, and rock wallabies • Get up close to Montgomery Reef as it emerges from the sea and discover the tidal reef’s diverse marine life • Visit the Important Bird Area of the Lacepede Islands, and spot numerous bird species throughout your voyage, including Eastern Ospreys and White-breasted Sea Eagles • Follow in the wake of Phillip Parker King on a cruise up the Prince Regent River to King Cascade waterfall • View the Kimberley landscape from the air on an optional scenic helicopter flight to Mitchell Falls (additional cost) • Enjoy sunset canapes and drinks on the beach as dusk settles over the Kimberley

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Ship information
Coral Adventurer
Vessel Type: Expedition Ship
Length: 93.4 meters
Passenger Capacity: 120
Crew Capacity: 42
Built: 2019
Designed and built to be the most modern tropical expedition ship afloat, Coral Adventurer debuted in April 2019. She features comfortable Australian interiors, Xplorer tender mechanism, intimate guest experience, and personalized service.
Bigger is not better
At a time when cruise ships get larger and glitzier, we remain stubbornly compact and intimate. Our ships are designed to take you to unspoilt destinations not accessible to large ships.  We want you to have the luxury of space, dine with whom you please, or find your quiet corner on deck.  So we have limited the Coral Adventurer to 60 spacious Staterooms and Suites.  This preserves the intimate atmosphere we are known for without sacrificing the stability and comfort of a true ocean going vessel.
Built for discovery
The Coral Adventurer features our trademark dual ‘Xplorer’ tenders cradled on a hydraulic platform slung off the back of the ship, enabling our guests to go ashore in comfort and ease.  The shallow draft of the ship enables us to go closer to shore than larger ships. Together with our renowned expedition team, our new ship will offer the most advanced expedition capabilities of any small ship afloat.
Built for comfort
With active stabilisers dampening sea motion, mostly balcony cabins, and interiors designed with the colours and textures of tropical Queensland, the Coral Adventurer is a comfortable ship.  She features promenade decks, generous communal areas that accommodate all guests, a passenger elevator, and an open kitchen where you can observe our chefs whip up small batch cuisine from locally sourced ingredients.
Built for personal service
The Coral Adventurer will continue our proud tradition of Australian flagged vessels with friendly and professional Australian crew.  Our onboard atmosphere remains refreshingly informal and intimate.  Take your seat at our bridge lounge, chat with the captain at your leisure or accompany our chefs on a market tour.
Food and wine features
Single seating dining area with communal ‘wine table’ finished with Australian stone; serving buffet breakfast and lunch, and multi-course table d’hote dinners • Showcase galley visible to guests for fresh small-batch cuisine featuring Australian produce • Multiple indoor and outdoor bars, including our Explorer bar on the sundeck for sunset drinks with 180 degree views • Curated wine cellar featuring modestly priced boutique wines for daily drinking and exceptional vintage Australian reds.
Guest comfort
All outside-facing Staterooms and Suites with en-suite bathrooms; majority have private balcony • Active stabilisers to dampen sea motion • Gym equipped with elliptical trainers and treadmills • Passenger elevator • Wi-Fi available in all guest areas
Contact
Booking
Luxury Small Ship Cruise
Silver Origin
19.06.2021
26.06.2021
7
Latin America, Galápagos Islands Luxury Cruise
Fare from € 9,990
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Travelroute
Day 1

San Cristobal and Kicker Rock

Like so many of the islands in the Galápagos, San Cristobal is formed by dormant volcanoes. It lies to the east of the archipelago and is one of the oldest islands in the group. Approximately 6,000 people live on the island, making their living from tourism, fishing, in government offices, or off the rich volcanic soils with some limited farming existing in the highlands. Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on the southwestern tip of the island is the capital city of the Galápagos Islands. A statue of Charles Darwin graces the harbor, marking one of the first places he likely stepped ashore in the 1830s.
Kicker Rock is the vertical remnant of a former tuff cone less than 5 kilometers to the west of San Cristobal. Both its Spanish name “Leon Dormido” (Sleeping Lion) and English name Kicker Rock imply that it is one rock only -when in fact it is a larger one 300 meters long by 100 meters wide with a maximum height of approximately 150 meters and next to it an obelisk-like rock separated by a narrow channel some 20 meters deep. When approaching Kicker Rock, Blue-footed Boobies, Nazca Boobies and frigatebirds can be observed in the air, while sea lions can be seen along the shore. Snorkelers and divers have reported manta rays, hammerhead sharks and turtles. The Spanish name implies that the geological formation seen from the south resembles a sleeping lion. An interesting explanation for the English name suggests that James Colnett in 1794 likened it to famous landmarks in Portsmouth.

Day 2

Isla Bartolome and Buccaneer Cove, Santiago

Our ship anchors in sight of the volcanic moonscape of Isla Bartolomé, at Sullivan Bay. Zodiacs bring guests ashore to ascend a boardwalk of 388 steps. Passing through the arid volcanic landscape provides a chance to watch for lava lizards, Galapagos Hawks, and Blue-footed Boobies. However, the climber’s ultimate reward is one of the most beautiful panoramas in all of the Galapagos Islands – the view towards Pinnacle Rock with black, volcanic cones of Baltra, Daphne Major and Daphne Minor in the distance. On the way down watch how the sunlight catches the green of pioneering plant species in stark contrast against dark volcanic rock, and look forward to time swimming and snorkeling from the golden beach at Bahia Dorada.

Day 3

Punta Vicente Roca (Isabela) and Punta Espinoza (Fernandina)

Punta Vicente Roca is one of the marine sites Isabela Island has to offer. On the southern side of Ecuador Volcano, the tip of land on the western end of Isabela is named after Vicente Ramon Roca, President of Ecuador from 1845-49, who as Prefect of Guayas had proposed the Ecuadorian annexation of the Galapagos Islands in 1831. The geological formations, the underwater caves and lava tubes offer fascinating views of the coastline. The South Equatorial Countercurrent hits this part of the archipelago from the west and the water offers abundant food sources for different marine life and seabirds. It is normal to see Pacific green turtles, but sharks, rays, whales and dolphins can also be expected, apart from a small colony of fur seals. Blue-footed Boobies, Nazca Boobies, Brown Noddies and other seabirds nest in the cliffs and both the endemic Galapagos Penguins and Flightless Cormorants have established small colonies nearby. Marine iguanas also like this area because of the rich variety of seaweeds growing underwater along the western coast of Isabela. As a marine site, deepwater snorkeling is also possible at Punta Vicente Roca.
With the gentle slopes of La Cumbre volcano in the distance, the low, lava-forged coast of Punta Espinoza on Fernandina Island is a spectacular sight. Hundreds of marine iguanas rest on the black rock of recent lava flows absorbing heat from the stone and defending their territories against one another. Galapagos sea lions and their pups also take shelter here, resting on the beach and playing in the shallow tide pools sprinkled along the coast. Walk past high sandy areas where marine iguanas lay their eggs and along low, shallow mangrove ponds ringed with bright red Sally Lightfoot crabs and Flightless Cormorants drying their stubby wings in the sunshine.

Day 4

Tagus Cove and Elizabeth Bay

Tagus Cove is bordered by a steep rocky coastline and has for centuries offered shelter for ships and yachts. The cove is named after the British frigate HMS Tagus visiting the Galapagos in 1814. Already by the 1830s other ships had their visits recorded by painting or scratching their name onto the rocks. On approach Galapagos Penguins and Flightless Cormorants –both birds mainly found on Isabela’s west coast and neighboring Fernandina- are often seen. From the landing a trail through an incense tree forest leads past Darwin Lake to a viewpoint on top of a splatter cone. During the hike several land birds including Medium Ground-Finches, Galapagos Hawks, Yellow Warblers as well as Large-billed and Vermilion Flycatchers are often present. Brown Noddies and Blue-footed Boobies prefer the rocks along the shore.
Elizabeth Bay is one of the marine sites on Isabela’s west coast. South of Alcedo Volcano and north of Sierra Negra, Elizabeth Bay is found at Isabela’s narrowest east-west extension where the lava flows of these two volcanoes have connected each other. Elizabeth Bay’s shores show mangroves and specifically the easternmost part, a cove which can only be entered via a narrow channel, has red, white and black mangroves. Different animals prefer different parts of Elizabeth Bay. Las Marielas, three rocks at the entrance to the bay, are favored by Blue-footed Boobies, Flightless Cormorants and Galapagos Penguins as a resting place, while the mangrove area is preferred by Great Blue Herons for hunting or the Magnificent Frigatebirds for perching. The bay is used by turtles, rays and even sharks for feeding or resting. The shallow water and the root system of the mangroves in the small inlet allow smaller fish to hide from bigger predators.

Day 5

Post Office Bay (Floreana), Champion Islet, Floreana and Punta Cormorant (Floreana)

Floreana’s Post Office Bay has received its name as the site was used to leave mail for retrieval by others who were thought to stop at the Galapagos Islands or might be heading for the addressee’s direction. First mentioned by Porter in 1813 as “Hathaway’s Postoffice”, HMS Beagle’s captain FitzRoy stated that it was not in use in 1835 as the island was already settled at that time. Floreana had been the first island to be settled by Ecuadorians in 1832. Today a barrel instead of the original box is used by visitors who leave their own postcards and retrieve mail for hand-delivery. Apart from the beach and mail barrel the bay offers good swimming and snorkeling. The area holds remains of a failed Norwegian fish canning plant and settlement dating back to the 1920s. A lava tube in the vicinity can also be explored. Although Floreana is inhabited, the number of residents is reduced because of the difficult access to water. A track from Post Office Bay connects with the only road from Puerto Velazco Ibarra on the west coast to a spring in the highlands.
Champion Islet is a small islet some 700 meters off the northeast coast of Floreana. It is one of four marine sites surrounding Floreana and offers excellent deepwater snorkeling opportunities. Curious sea lions approach the snorkelers while turtles slowly swim by and sharks, sting rays, and a high diversity of colorful fishes can usually be seen. During a Zodiac cruise around Champion Islet not only seabirds such as Nazca Boobies, Swallow-tailed Gulls, or Red-billed Tropicbirds will be seen, it is also possible to spot the rare Floreana Mockingbird.
Floreana Island’s northernmost point is called Punta Cormorant – named after the British naval vessel HMS Cormorant and dating back to the late 19th century. From the landing beach a short track leads to a shallow lagoon that is famous for its flamingos. The brilliantly pink birds skim the salty waters for shrimp and tend to chicks on the nest. The trail then scales a low hillside through scattered Palo Santo trees to reveal an idyllic white-sand beach on the other side of the point. Standing at the edge of the lapping waves, you might spot mammoth female sea turtles hauling themselves out of the sea to lay eggs in the sugar sand dunes that lay high above the tide line. Before returning to the landing site your guides may also point out White-cheeked Pintails, Blue-footed Boobies, Yellow Warblers, and Medium and Small Ground Finches.

Day 6

Santa Cruz Highlands and Fausto Llerena Breeding Center, Puerto Ayora

Los Gemelos (The Twins) is a visitor site in the Santa Cruz highlands. Found some 15 kilometers northwest of Puerto Ayora, the road leading from Puerto Ayora in the south of Santa Cruz to Itabaca in the north dissects the twin pit craters. Pit craters are formed when the roof of an underground void collapses. The smaller pit crater is on the eastern side of the road, while the larger one is on the western side. See from above, the two openings in the ground are not at all identical. Their layout might imply an elongated magma chamber or a lava tube leading further west and the larger twin actually having formerly been two small pit craters whose connecting wall collapsed as well. Trails through a Scalesia forest not only give access to good views of the pit craters, but also permit to observe some of the smaller land birds. Vermilion Flycatchers, Yellow Warblers, Galapagos Doves, Medium Ground Finches and several other finch species can often be seen there.
Silver Origin will anchor in front of Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz, where the prestigious Charles Darwin Research Station is located. The station also houses the Fausto Llerena Breeding Center for giant tortoises and land iguanas where guides interpret the centre’s captive breeding and reintroduction programs. In addition to these star species, throughout the station there are huge prickly pear cactus trees being fed upon by the pretty Galapagos Cactus Finch. To round out the stay in Puerto Ayora, enjoy free time in town where local artists have created charming art galleries and corner cafés.

Day 7

Cerro Dragon (Santa Cruz), Isla Guy Fawkes and Bahía Borrero, Santa Cruz

Cerro Dragón’s land iguanas once played an important part in a conservation program headed by the Charles Darwin Foundation and the Galapagos National Park. When the reptiles’ numbers declined in the 1970s, some animals were taken to breed in captivity and were released back into undeveloped areas. Today, it is an honor to see the success of this program firsthand at Cerro Dragón. Walk inland on a trail past small saltwater lagoons that periodically feature flamingos, to see the reintroduced animals. In a periodic local phenomenon, during rainier times the salinity in the lagoons drops with the inflow of freshwater. As a consequence crustacean populations decline, which in turn means the shorebirds become scarce.
In the northern area of Santa Cruz Island, Bahía Borrero is a beautiful white coralline beach used as a nesting site by Green Sea turtles. Behind the dunes, we have a forest of typical vegetation from the arid zone: Palo Santo, Leather leaf, and Salty bushes. This vegetation welcomes Yellow Warblers, and some of the most characteristic species of Darwin Finches, such as the Common Cactus Finch or the Small Ground Finch. This extinct volcano, due to its altitude, shows all the different zones of vegetation, changing from the littoral to the arid, and then with more moisture into the humid zone, to end in the dry pampa zone. It is an impressive landscape to enjoy while you swim in the turquoise waters of the bay or have a nice relaxing walk along the beach.

Day 8

Baltra

Disembarkation.
Baltra Island, also known as South Seymour, is truly the entrance to the Galapagos Islands. Despite not being considered as part of the National Park proper, Baltra definitely offers a taste of the weird and wonderful nature that thrives on the islands. The island is located in the central part of the archipelago. At just eight sq. mi it is one of smallest islands, yet its flat, volcanic rock surface and central location in the archipelago makes it an ideal place for one of the islands’ two airports. The airport was built by the US Air Force, who used it as an army base during WWII. As a travel destination in itself it offers few attractions, and all travellers who come here are just passing through, either on either way to or from the islands. There is no tourism infrastructure (save a few agencies that offer tours of the islands) or shops on Baltra and any purchases that you might wish to make should be done at the airport if they can. However, land iguanas and Galapagos finches are popular sights, and the iguanas are often seen running across the runway itself. As you cross the Itabaca Channel to or from Santa Cruz, be on the lookout for some other Galapagian locals: giant turtles and playful sea lions completely oblivious to the humans around.

Ship information

Galápagos Islands Luxury Cruise

Including return flights between Ecuador and Galápagos.

The weird and wonderful Galápagos Islands are definitely contenders for the world best travel destination. These are the islands where the animals look at humans curiously, rather than the other way around! Inspiring and educational, each island has its own species and strengths, ranging from miles of dramatic coastline to nesting colonies of endemic birds. The islands may be small, but be prepared for some big surprises! Ticking off all 15 species of the Galapagos Big 15, this seven day voyage is perfect for curious cruisers! From marine iguanas to Galapagos Hawks, to the iconic blue-footed boobie, no other place on Earth can compare to the Galapagos’ fusion of flora and fauna. Join us to explore the volcanic landscapes that time forgot, discover unique wildlife both above and below the sea, drinking in the drama and depth of natural history along the way.
Highlights

Guided Zodiac, land and sea tours, and shoreside activities led by the Expeditions Team • Enrichment lectures by a highly qualified Expeditions Team • Isla Bartolomé & Santiago Island • Fernandina Island, Isabela Island and more • Amazing Wildlife & Snorkelling

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Ship information

Silver Origin

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition
Length: 101 metres
Passenger Capacity: 100
Crew: 90
Built: 2020

The first destination specific ship built by Silversea, Silver Origin is the height of experiential travel in the Galápagos. Never before have the islands been so superbly presented: a team of Ecuadorian national expert guides, the highest crew-to-guest ratio in the Galápagos, 8 Zodiacs, seamless hybrid spaces that offer an extraordinary voyage – for extraordinary people. All-suite accommodation, Horizon Balconies, butler service, sophisticated interiors, interactive basecamp, Ecuadorian inspired cuisine … no aspect of Silver Origin has been left to chance. The most environmentally conscious ship we have ever built, take a vertical leap and transform your idea of travel with Silver Origin.

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